2019 Individual Film Links

For a film to get its own page on the main 2019 links page, it must receive at least 5 link submissions from our members with few exceptions. Here is a list of all films that haven’t quite reached that threshold yet. When it does, it will be moved to the main page and removed from this page.

2050

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: To simply dismiss it because of surface notions is to ignore the slippery slope of where we are going as a population ruled by new technological advancements everyday.

#Like

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: #Like attempts to break down the idea that women have to be perfect to be worthy of justice.

143 Sahara Street

Jordan Smith @ Nonfics.com

The 16th Episode

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

3 from Hell

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Fans of Zombie’s style will find plenty of things to like, though it doesn’t quite match the quality of its predecessor.

47 Meters Down: Uncaged

Steve Biodrowski @ Hollywood Gothique

  • Excerpt: 47 Meters Down: Uncaged is summer movie junk food: it’s not nutritious, but you will enjoy snacking on its empty calories as much as sharks enjoy snacking on empty-headed divers.

Alex Brannan @ CineFiles Reviews

Absurd Accident

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Absurd Accident pulls from various recognizable influences, but writer/director, Li Yuhe, forms it into an entertaining dark comedy that feels wholly its own.

An Acceptable Loss

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: An Acceptable Loss is a film that thinks it’s deep and profound when, in reality, it’s incredibly shallow.

Adopt a Highway

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

Adults in the Room in San Sebastian FF

Paulo Portugal @ insider [Portuguese]

After

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: If you are a Teen, you’ll love it…If not, then you’ll hate it…

After Maria

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

After Midnight

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

After the Wedding

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An emotionally literate drama in which the characters must deal with their past and present choices.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: You may not be deeply moved when it’s over, but the quality of the performances and the poignant ideas explored are enough to satisfy the need for a good human-centered story.

The Aftermath

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: it is a real letdown to realize that director James Kent (“Testament of Youth”) has played a game of bait and switch, a complex historical period used as a mere backdrop for the story of a marriage teetering on the brink.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Post WWII upheaval is a cheap backdrop to beautiful people getting it on. Characters and situations are undeveloped, and there little genuine romance here, and too much laughable preposterousness.

Aga

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a mysterious, stunning, melancholy tale about a disappearing way of life, one being corrupted by humankind’s progression…“Ága” goes to the ends of the earth to reveal global truths.

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Beautifully directed, using a cast with little acting experience, wise Milko Lazarov weaves a story with little rehearsal.

Ága

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Visually stunning portrait of the spiritual struggles of indigenous people to survive.

All in My Family

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

All Is True

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Elton’s cast the demoralized literary icon into a swirl of scandal, bitterness and’ regret and Branagh’s characterization has allowed him to climb back out again, making peace with a family sidelined by genius.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Kenneth Branagh explores what Shakespeare’s retirement may have looked like – familial scandal, remorse for past mistakes, and attempts toward future happiness. Performances outshine a lackluster, melodramatic script – but check out Ian McKellen’s few minutes on screen; he about walks away with the whole project.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: The result is a well-made and well-acted piece of historical fiction whose big picture construct is sadly in opposition with its small picture intrigue.

All Rise

Candice Frederick @ Essence

All the Colors of Giallo

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Standing alone, the competent titular documentary would not be of exceptional interest; it’s the extras that put this three-disc set over.

All These Small Moments

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: All These Small Moments is a charming, well-acted New York City coming-of-age set against a family-in-crisis drama.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Melissa Miller-Costanzo’s directorial debut is as assured and empathetic coming-of-age film that doesn’t do many things new, but does them with well and with a tender touch.

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: Though this sweet, subtle, and sentimental work is a smidge too simplistic in narrative design, it wins over any resistance with its quiet refinement and heartrending insight.

Alternate Endings

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Six creative ways dying people and their families are taking control of their deaths and the disposal of their remains.

Always Be My Maybe

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: The positive influence of When Harry Met Sally is noticeable in the undercurrents, but this romantic comedy has its own unique identity.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Doesn’t rock the rom-com boat but absolutely delightful anyway. A smart, modern romantic comedy that flips genre scripts and finds a freshness in making room for new voices and new perspectives.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Just because this zany streak is where the film’s replay value lies, however, doesn’t mean the filmmakers didn’t also pack plenty of emotional weight.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Affectionately blending their own societal zest from their place in America’s Melting Pot, Wong and Park bring new voices as a genius comic pairing. Much of the method of Always Be My Maybe may be routine, but the resulting charm is unfailingly welcome.

Amazing Grace

Rick Aragon @
Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: I stopped going to church in my teens, but if church were like this I’d be going every Sunday. The power of Lady Soul’s voice produces more shivers, more goosebumps, in ninety minutes than any thriller.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: To relive [this moment] in such resplendent glory is thus a gift no matter how simple the concept. This once transient moment now has the permanence to live on forever.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: There’s no story arc, no build to a boffo climax. It’s the Queen of Soul, singing her soul out with amazing grace and unearthly talent.

American Factory

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Cultural clashes in factories.

American Woman

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: about the in between time, a suspension of a woman’s motherhood but not her life…Sienna Miller really digs deep here

The Amityville Murders

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

Among Wolves

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: A hypnotic cinematic poem to survival in the aftermath of war.

And Breathe Normally

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A moving story that showcases the need for openness and hospitality in our increasingly constricted world.

And Your Bird Can Sing

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

  • Excerpt: If Richard Linklater had come of age in 21st century Japan, this is what Dazed and Confused might have looked like.

Angels Are Made of Light

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An engaging documentary about Afghanistan’s youth that activates our empathy.

The Angry Birds Movie 2

Alex Brannan @ CineFiles Reviews
MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Painfully stupid faux-woke slapstick that wants to have its idiot male hero and its nods to feminism at the same time. Kids are listening, they are absorbing this garbage, and they deserve better.

Amir Siregar @ Amir at the Movies [Indonesian]

  • Excerpt: It’s pretty clear that the makers don’t intend for this to be anything other than a kiddie flick. And that’s precisely the reason why ‘The Angry Birds Movie 2’ works. Huge, huge step up from its predecessor.

Aniara

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Kågerman and Lilja bring Martinson’s poem to cinemas with a stark beauty both in its sci-fi production design and emotionally wrought performances.

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Any One of Us

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: Not surprisingly, deep depression and feelings of uselessness eat away at the inner being of these survivors.

Arctic

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Joe Penna makes his feature debut with a gripping survival thriller that is all the more satisfying for not spelling everything out for us.

Blake Howard @ Graffiti With Punctuation
Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: That’s all you can ask from a survival film such as this: honesty. It’s not therefore about life or death, but humanity’s perseverance.

Arjun Patiala

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood
Glenn Dunks @ The Film Experience

  • Excerpt: It’s amazing to think that there can still be so much previously unseen footage from the biggest television event in history, and yet here we are at the 50th anniversary of the moon landing with a bus-load of new documentaries claiming new takes, new interviews and, yes, new footage.

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

Article 15

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood
Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: In a plot that is centred on a twin murder in Indian heartlands, ‘Article 15’ is about the local society’s intrinsically trickled-in caste dynamics, ways of power politics as well as the central protagonist’s (Ayushmann Khurrana) coming-of-age.

Asako I & II

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks

Asako I and II

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Hamaguchi himself refers to the divide as the Everyday versus the Unexpected, but his his literal symbolism of Ryôhei as harbor after an earthquake versus Baku’s fireworks more aptly translates to safety and solidity versus danger and excitement.

Ash Is Purest White

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: While their ever-changing romance is the film’s lynchpin, its ability to contrast them against each other proves more crucial than that which they are or aren’t as a unit.

Darren Mooney @ the m0vie blog

  • Excerpt: A pure delight.

Paulo Portugal @ Insider [Portuguese]

Ask Dr. Ruth

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: For someone like me who really did know her as a comedic footnote in pop culture, Ask Dr. Ruth proves crucial to restoring her legacy.

Frank Ochieng @ ScrreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Ask Dr. Ruth is both playful and piercing in its spotlight shining on a strong, achieving giggly feminine force that conquered lingering personalized adversity with sexual advisory potency.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: A documentary is only as good as its subject, and in Dr. Ruth Westheimer, director Ryan White (The Keepers) has a live one: a 4-foot, 7-inch bundle of irrepressible joy wrapped around a core of impenetrable sadness.

Atlantics

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Atlantics has an intriguing enough story and Mati Diop manages some fascinating scenes of tension and emotion, but it lacks the narrative momentum for it to really take off.

Auggie

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: “Auggie” was written and directed by 28-year-old actor/director Matt Kane. He had a great cast to work with, but to see Richard Kind writhing on the living room floor with an imaginary love interest was just too much.

The Australian Dream

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: The Australian Dream is shattering. And now, the illusion of our country can’t be unshattered.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: A simple, yet brutally effective action movie with Scott Adkins and Jesse V. Johnson working at the top of their game.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: This is a gritty, mean, down and dirty crime story about gritty, mean, down and dirty criminals. It’s also Johnson’s most ambitious film to date, as well as maybe his best.

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: It’s not a word that is commonly used, but the best definition I found for avengement is “the inflicting of retributive punishment”. That reasonably sums up the bulk of what happens in the hour and a half of this newest collaboration of producer and star Scott Adkins and writer-director Jesse V. Johnson.

Ayka

Amber Wilkinson @ Eye For Film

  • Excerpt: They say it’s the hope that kills you and Dvortsevoy lets enough light in to emphasise her plight.

Babylon

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Frank Ochieng @ Screenanarchy

  • Excerpt: …revealing and raw in its political and sociological spectrum. Unapologetically radical, intrusive and emotionally gripping…a blistering commentary…

Bachman

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: What Randy Bachman is like, with interviews from friends, family, including daughter and son, and others in the biz, is filtered through the song clips and his own comments on his life. This film isn’t anything like the extravaganza of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” but it does give a good background to the life and music of Randy Bachman.

Backs Against the Wall: The Howard Thurman Story

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Top-drawer documentary on the African-American mystic, pastor, and spiritual mentor to leaders in the civil rights movement.

Bacurau

Chris Barsanti @ PopMatters [Croatian]

  • Excerpt: Loony anti-colonialist Brazilian satire Bacurau doesn’t always balance its humor with its bite, but its communitarian soul, oddball wit, and dark vision of the future still hits home.

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Bacurau is a wonderfully weird western that is as funny as it is hard hitting and thrilling.

Badla

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Barbara Rubin and the Exploding NY Underground

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A fascinating portrait of a “larger than life” filmmaker and collaborator.

Batman vs. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: More than a new chapter in cinematic history, Green’s film becomes a key piece towards revising everything we thought we knew.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: If you’re a movie buff, this is one of the most exciting movies you’ll see this year. And it should do its part to ensure that Alice Guy-Blaché is, in the words of the current New York Times revisionist obituary series, overlooked no more.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: What a wonderful experience it is to be taken on Pamela B. Green’s tenacious journey to uncover the story of the first female director, screenwriter, producer and studio owner!

Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blaché

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Not only a portrait of the woman who made more than a thousand of the very first films, but a mystery detective story about how the achievements of a trailblazing woman were erased, and found again.

The Beach Bum

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: So either you enjoy this never-ending frivolous dance or you tire of it. Despite being of the latter, Moondog and company’s infectious allure still won me over.

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: ..a generic stoner comedy flick that has all the natural high of an unfiltered, soggy joint. Cluttered and chaotic, The Beach Bum is nothing but pointless piffle simply overdosing on its own brand of “rude-dude” drudgery.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: I’d be impressed if Korine had the self-deprecating self-awareness to make Moondog an autobiographical stand-in. But even if he did, that still wouldn’t make ‘The Beach Bum’ a good movie.

Beats

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Becoming Nobody

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An interview with the renowned spiritual teacher on the really big questions of life.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: A non-critical and unfocused but diverting documentary on the American academic who dropped out to become an influential spiritual teacher advocate for those seeking the inner truth.

Behind the Bullet

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: If there’s any concrete message in Behind the Bullet, it’s that our emotions are valid in the conversation surrounding gun violence.

Bel Canto

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This tonal misfire never hits the notes of drama and romance it aims for with its ickily problematic terrorist-hostage relationships. Facile and uncomfortably implausible, emotionally and practically.

Belzebuth

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Bennett’s War

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Bennett’s War has clunky, unimaginative dialogue and stiff performances.

Berlin, I Love You

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: As the world’s most avid movie musical fan, I was bowled over by Jenna Dewan’s fantasy dance scene. And I felt the same way about the delightful conversation between Dianna Agron and and Luke Wilson, who play a charming puppeteer and burned-out Hollywood producer, respectively.

Berserk

Marina Antunes @ Quiet Earth
Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: If it’s intended to be a darkly farcical neo-noir, the tone feels off, and ultimately the lack of stakes and danger renders “Berserk” null and void of much purpose.

The Best of Enemies

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Although dramatically surreal and dripping with ready-made inspiration, The Best of Enemies feels unevenly pat and plays it rather safe without exploring the racially charged obstacles with a more pronounced grittiness.

Bethany Hamilton: Unstoppable

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: This is an entertaining look at one of the most prominent sports figures of our time, and it’s packed with breathtaking surfing footage.

Between Two Ferns: The Movie

Derek Deskins @ Edge Media Network

  • Excerpt: This was clearly a movie that was developed on the fly, an exercise in improvisation, and while that may be a gift to the improv experimenters (and the cast), it leaves it feeling like a puzzle that was never fully assembled.

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: I have seen Between Two Ferns: The Movie, and I will watch it again, and, to be completely transparent, I’ve been skipping through its best bits on Netflix while writing this very review.

Beyond the Night

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Beyond the Night is an engrossing thriller filled with strong characters and an intruging central mystery that keeps you guessing.

Bharat

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Entertaining for most parts, ‘Bharat’ has its share of moments despite not exploring possibilities such as India’s development trajectory.

Birds of Passage

Josh Brunsting @ The CriterionCast
Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: unlike [“Embrace of the Serpent”], while this also charts the corruption of long tradition by greed and wealth, “Birds of Passage” becomes more of a family saga, a familiar story of drug money instigating violence.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Birds of Passage is packed with tropes of the classic Mafia drama. There are imposing godfathers, ambitious up-and-comers, gun-happy loose cannons, psychotics, and gorgeous molls. There are blood feuds, dead bodies, lines drawn and crossed.

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

Black and Blue

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

Bliss

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Bliss is abrasive, moody, and nasty, but for a certain audience, its relentles griminess is a feature, not a bug.

Dennis Schwartz Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Please note that Begos is an admirer of madman filmmaker Gaspar Noé.

Blood Will Tell

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Pace moves too slowly with suspense. Still, what’s revealed does make some sense. A puzzling film that’s hard to view means patience needed to see it through.

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

  • Excerpt: I would love to become the new Secreto de sus ojos.

Bloodline

Roxana Hadadi @ The A.V. Club

  • Excerpt: Bloodline gives its characters just enough interiority to probe at the idea that parenthood’s combination of “love and total panic at the same time,” as Lauren says, can push someone toward murderous madness.

Blowin’ Up

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A fly-on-the-wall peek into a court in New York City where women work to help other women with realistic solutions to complicated problems. A wonderful ode to creative and compassionate thinking.

Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Even if jazz is not your thing, Huber’s rich musical history of its preeminent label is something to sink into.

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Frankly, though this is a well-made film detailing the rise of a company, there is plenty more room for the stories of the makers of that company. While Huber gets a series of musicians to extol the greatness of Blue Note, she misses what would give it a meaningful impact — the stories behind the scenes.

Book of Monsters

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

Book Smart

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: An exceptional piece of coming-of-age filmmaking both emotionally resonant and very funny. An impressive directorial debut from Olivia Wilde.

The Bouncer

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The Bouncer is a simple, but effective crime film that features a compelling, understated performance from Jean-Claude Van Damme.

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind

Emmanuel Báez @ Cinéfiloz [Spanish]
Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A tribute to a creative, determined, and compassionate African boy.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Chiwetel Ejiofor’s directorial debut is a modest film about human ingenuity in the face of incredible obstacles. It’s simple, but very effective.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: An inspiring true story about a courageous young boy who persisted with his inventive idea that saved many lives in Malawi, Africa.

Braid

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Time becomes malleable [as Pierone] removes the pathways from one scene to another so we can find ourselves in the same bottomless rabbit hole as her characters.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Keep your expectations at the level of a smart B-thriller and you may be pleasantly surprised by how well ‘Braid’ threads these three women together.

The Breaker Upperers

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: This New Zealsand comedy had me in stitches most of the time, thanks to its hilarious co-stars Madeleine Sami and Jackie van Beck, who also co-wrote and co-directed the film.

Breakthrough

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: You need to have a bit of a cold heart not to be touched by Breakthrough.

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Breakthrough is warmly inviting for its ability to be honest, moving, melancholy, and deliver its truthfulness in profound revelation. Anchored by solidly heartfelt performances steeped in the holy belief system of faith and perseverance

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Well, good believers love divine challenges and so does this Breakthrough starring Chrissy Metz.

The Brink

Laura Clifford @ Reelling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a footnote past its expiration date.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: I feared a portrait of human dumpster fire Steve Bannon would humanize him, but he’s beyond that. Can we use this inside look at his political and cultural manipulations to stop his fomenting of hate?

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Alison Klayman, a progressive Jewish granddaughter of Holocaust survivors, consented to produce/direct a film on a man with whose ideas she does not agree.

Buddy

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: “Buddy” is a tender story of human-animal connection created by one of the greatest filmmakers of all time.

Buffalo Boys

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: director Mike Wiluan fumbles a bit with tone with a film that initially seems like a Jackie Chan vehicle before morphing into a brutally violent indictment of Dutch colonialism. He definitely has a talent for staging action scenes, though

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: That final showdown is a hoot, with four-barrel shotguns, cannons, arrows, knives, axes and hatchets among the various implements of death and destruction. Imagine that finale in The Wild Bunch, with fewer people, but bigger explosions and bloodier deaths.

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: Funny as it is, the viewer has a hard time deciding if it is cool neo-western or outright camp.

Bunuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: I would advise anyone planning on seeing this film to see Land without Bread first, and then see how Bunuel and company created some of the more dramatic images.

Buñuel in the Labyrinth of the Turtles

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It reveals a Buñuel consumed with jealousy of Dali, insistent that he is the preeminent Spanish surrealist, as well as obsessed with death, morbidly so when it comes to the animals of the mountainous northern territory.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Provides as much insight into the often-manipulated “truth” of Las Hurdes as the filmmaker’s nightmare-fueled psychology.

Burn

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Burn is a solid thriller that efficiently sustains a weird, off-putting energy for its entire runtime. Tilda Cobham-Hervey shines as the lead.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

By the Grace of God

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This winner of the Silver Bear at the 2019 Berlin Film Festival barrels forward at breakneck speed, yet no one in Ozon’s large ensemble gets short shrift. The victims of a crime become activists demanding – and achieving – justice in a work both bracing and infuriating.

Calm with Horses

Roxana Hadadi @ Pajiba

  • Excerpt: The cast of Irish drama ‘Calm With Horses’ elevates familiar themes about masculinity, violence, and poverty.

Caminhos Magnétykos

Paulo Portugal @ Insider [Portuguese]

Canary

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Christiaan Olwagen’s hugely ambitious year-in-the-life musical charts one young man’s journey to self acceptance during the height of the Apartheid regime…Bezuidenhout, who has the face of a silent film comedian, is a multi-talented lead.

The Cannibal Club

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Although the upper class may not literally be eating the lower classes, they’re damn sure doing the job on a figurative level.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Captive State

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog VI [Croatian]
Oktay Kozak @ Paste Magazine
Frank Ochieng @ SF Crowsnest

  • Excerpt: Captive State feels labored in murkiness and confusion…another derivative disaster movie basically flexing a basic bicep of puff-piece paranoia.

The Cat Rescuers

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A tiny, delicate, inspiring metaphor for the reshaping of attitudes we will need to make on a planetary scale, and for the effort we’ll need to expend to clean up the enormous messes we have made.

Cat Sticks

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Cat Sticks is a bold, confident debut. Sen’s low-key photography lends gravitas to the existence of these addicts usually treated as blights on society’s face.

Catch-22

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An expose on the egregious myth that World War II was the Good War.

The Cave

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An emotionally rich portrait of an inspiring young doctor caring for her patients in the Syrian war.

Jordan Smith @ Nonfics.com

Celeste

Blake Howard @ Flicks.com.au

Censored

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Ripped from the headlines, or at least the Saturday night movie theatre, the forbidden turns out to be in all of us.

The Chambermaid

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Slice-of-life film about a young maid at a luxury hotel coping with and rising above the messiness of her work life.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: director Lila Avilés shines a light on the life of a woman who crosses paths with many but is seen by few.

The Changeover

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: The Changeover is a well-made fantasy YA movie that features a terrifying villainous turn by Timothy Spall.

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Frank ochieng @ SF Crowsnest

  • Excerpt: It is not often that a YA-based SF/fantasy/horror spectacle is received with a satisfactory amount of fleshed out characterisations to accompany the nail-biting action with adequate evenness. New Zealand’s ‘The Changeover’ is a character-driven frightfest at its small-scare creative core.

Ron Wilkinson @ Its Just Movies

  • Excerpt: An easy going production with time-honored tropes fails to raise a ruckus.

The Chaperone

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …has its charms, largely due to McGovern, but it’s also hokey and its production is lacking

Chhichhore

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Sometimes dramatic and otherwise insanely funny, director Nitesh Tiwari’s ‘Chhichhore’ works like magic with its decision to remain uncomplicated. While the ensemble cast does very well, it is Varun Sharma and Naveen Polishetty who amass maximum hoots.

El Chicano

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: …the humorless and dark tendencies feel utterly labored. Dripping in brutish violence as a police procedural, El Chicano is a sunken saga riddled in strained grade-B crime drama cliches.

Chintu Ka Birthday

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Starring Vinay Pathak and Tillotama Shome, Kumar Devanshu and Satyanshu Singh’s ‘Chintu Ka Birthday’ laced with extraordinary sound by Bishwadeep Chatterjee, gives you a fly on the wall account of an Indian family’s life in war-struck Baghdad.

Clara

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A close encounter with the ineffable mysteries of both human relationships and the universe.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: This combination creates an intimate and daring film experience that enraptures as easily and as powerfully as it fascinates.

Clemency

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An emotionally rich drama that explores the moral and ethical impact of the death penalty on those required to enforce it.

Climax

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: [Noé]’s produced a film that features all of his taboo busters and yet, surprisingly, it may be his most accessible to date…a film that grabs you from its opening shoot and never lets go.

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: Climax is alternately an endurance test and pure art-house cinema, but there’s still no way to deny Gaspar Noé’s berserk descent into hell and loss of control being effectively visceral and unforgettable.

Dan Lybarger @ Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

  • Excerpt: In depicting a rave gone horribly wrong, his current movie, Climax, features intriguing stylistic choices, but it’s hard to feel sad or angry about what led the people in his movie down a destructive path.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Noé seems intent to render narrative as meaningless as possible. Who and where succumbs to the experiential act itself.

Close

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: An intriguing female-driven thriller directed and co-written by Vicky Jewson. Don’t worry, guys, the action scenes are also very exciting.

CoinCoin and the Extra-Humans

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It is not quite as satisfying as the first and will be even less so for those just coming aboard, but there is still much to enjoy in the warped wisdom of Van Der Weyden and the comical silent reactions of his trusty lieutenant Carpentier (Philippe Jore).

Cold Case Hammarskjold

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A chilling tale of conspiracy well-told.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: With conspiracy theories tumbling out of the Oval Office and a tide of white supremacy risiing across the land, the release of “Cold Case Hammarskjöld” couldn’t be more timely. At turns incredibly entertaining and jaw-droppingly horrifying, there’s never been anything quite like it…

Glenn Dunks @ The Film Experience

  • Excerpt: But this story of (possible) intrigue, (maybe) scandal, and even (potential) AIDS warfare (!!!) is treated with none of the acute seriousness that it (probably) deserves.

Collisions

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: “Collisions,” a very sensitive film on US Immigration and Customs Enforcement practice.

Color Out of Space

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

The Combination Redemption

Blake Howard @ Flicks.com.au

Communion

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The film becomes a document of Ola’s lost innocence, hardening her to the reality that faith only gets us so far.

Corporate Animals

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Corporate culture gets a delightfully twisted kick in the ass when a “team-building retreat” turns disastrous. As horror vies with comedy, the pitch(black)-perfect cast gets the balance just right.

Country Music

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A monumental series about the history, impact, and musicians of the popular music genre.

Creating Woodstock

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: The secrets behind the production of the 1969 three-day Woodstock music festival are spilled. How close and in how many ways the event skimmed catastrophe is documented in “Creating Woodstock,” a definitive documentary on the behind-the-scenes machinations of an event known across generations throughout the western world.

The Crossing

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This uninvolving coming-of-age crime drama tries to dazzle with visual tricksiness, but it cannot make up for its teen protagonist who is mere metaphorical symbol, and a bystander in her own story.

Culture Shock

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Guerrero’s film embodies the brutal process immigrants must endure to find a better life, and also the processes working against them to ensure they assimilate entirely into American culture.

The Curse of Buckout Road

Mark Harris @ BlackHorrorMovies.com

The Curse of the Weeping Woman

Amir Siregar @ Amir at the Movies [Indonesian]

  • Excerpt: The real curse of the movie is its generic and bland scares along its storyline. Happy for Linda Cardellini’s first movie as a lead but ‘The Curse of the Weeping Woman’ will bore you to tears.

Daughter of the Wolf

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: The filmmakers adeptly blur the lines between the heroes and anti-heroes, constructing a dynamic, character-driven portrait of rage and redemption

David Crosby: Remember My Name

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Biodocumentary about a rock star whose love of music helped him overcome his self-destructiveness.

Laura Cifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Eaton’s changing interview venues keep things fresh and he limits most of his other talking heads to archival footage, allowing Crosby to tell his own story

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Day Shall Come

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The Day Shall Come is one of the year’s biggest disappointments. The satire is limp and lifeless, and it just isn’t a particularly funny movie.

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: The Day Shall Come is not quite as hard-edged as his previous feature, but there is still a good amount of fun to go with the messaging seen this time around.

De De Pyaar De

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

Dead End

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Deadtectives

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Tony West’s Deadtectives mixes horror and comedy, sometimes well, sometimes not. The beginning is rough; the comedy sitcom-y, the horror forced and toothless, but near the halfway mark, the film strikes a balance between jokes and scares—and leans into the spooky.

The Death of Dick Long

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Easily the best movie about an Alabama-based Nickelback cover band I’ve ever seen.

Debt

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: While we quickly become sympathetic to the plight of the hapless Tufan, every character around him is experiencing some kind of pain, be it financial or emotional, and how they interact with each other is subtly exposed as a series of debits and credits.

The Deeper You Dig

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: It’s super slick for such a DIY production, making the most of what it has—off-kilter premise, isolated setting, inherent strangeness—and takes less obvious paths available when you don’t have a ton of external oversight.

Deerskin

Alan Mattli @ Maximum Cinema [German]

  • Excerpt: Consistently fun to watch, not least because Dupieux knows how to use the film’s rough and sketchy edges to his advantage.

Desolate

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

Desolation Center

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Despite Everything

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Devil’s Revenge

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: William Shatner battles the Devil with a grenade launcher, so there’s that. Only that, but still…

Diamantino

Paulo Portugal @ Insider.pt [Portuguese]

Diane

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A deeply spiritual movie that provides a slice of a caregiver’s life.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: What Alfonso Cuaron recently accomplished with “Roma,” transporting memories of his Mexican childhood onto the screen so acutely they felt like they were ours, has been given a New England spin in writer/director Kent Jones’ feature film debut.

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Diane is thoroughly engaging in its spotlighted numbness. Meticulously intimate and bracing, Diane is an embodiment of ailing womanhood hinging on unclear fears, regrets, loss, and empathy.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Diane is like a brooch discovered in an attic trunk. It’s dusty and a little old-fashioned, but it gives off a glow.

Diego Maradona

Ron Wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: Sports heroism is under the microscope, warts and all, in this riveting soccer documentary.

Dilan 1991

Bavner Donaldo @ Cinejour [Indonesian]

Dilili in Paris

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A French animated film about justice for women.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It’s absolutely astonishing to look at, a lovely visit to the City of Lights that quite literally glows… but the [English language] voice actors are all so wooden, they sound like the result of a translation program.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: It’s too cerebral for children, yet too haphazardly constructed to satisfy adults.

The Dirt

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s gross-out impulses are entertaining enough, but it still falls back on the same formula that we’ve seen in so many biopics.

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: No movie could ever fully capture the insanity that was Motley Crue, but The Dirt comes about as close as possible.

The Divine Fury

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Finally, the South Korean MMA exorcism movie you’ve been waiting for.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: The Divine Fury has enough unique qualities to set it apart from the countless exorcism flicks already out there, and the story’s focus on how a person can turn anger / hatred into a positive force for good is an awesome, unusually uplifting narrative to find in the religious horror sub-genre.

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

  • Excerpt: The Divine Fury manages to take cliches and spin genre gold out of them.

Dogman

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Fonte is fantastic […] but if the narrative he’s beholden to won’t let me invest in his journey, it’s all for naught.

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle
Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: A film of the most beautiful of losers, too abstract for its own good.

Dolemite is My Name

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist
Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

  • Excerpt: The meta nature of Murphy’s casting and the powerhouse performance he delivers in the role is sure to be an awards season narrative.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Domino

Roderick Heath @ This Island Rod

  • Excerpt: Domino proves a galvanising experience in regards to the current movie scene, as pure an auteurist artefact as any I’ve seen and one that, in its way, recalls many a late B movie excursion from the major talents of a much earlier filmmaking generation: Fritz Lang or Edgar G. Ulmer would have entirely understood Domino.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: The film declares the CIA as shady but necessary and the families of POC unworthy of even being spoken about alongside those of white knights with badges.

Donnybrook

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Some viewers will be put off by Donnybrook’s relentless misery and abject despair—there’s not a glint of hope to find, even in the devastating final moment. But it’s a primal cry, an injury that won’t heal, and a weighty, powerful look at the underbelly of America’s decaying heartland.

Jonathan Richards @ Pasatiempo

  • Excerpt: Sutton (Memphis, Dark Night) achieves a lot of what he’s after in painting his bleak picture of life on the desperate fringes. It’s just so damned unpleasant to watch, and difficult, too — some scenes are rendered in such darkness, both of tone and of lighting, that you can’t see what’s going on, and believe me, you don’t want to.

Ron Wilkinson @ Its Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Rough and tumble violence in an uncaring world.

Dons of Disco

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Don’t

Frank Ochieng @ Screen Anarchy

  • Excerpt: Don’t Come Back from the Moon is a small-sized affecting coming-of-age tale with a big scale heart and thought-provoking conviction. Thoroughly probing and perceptive, the conscious cow does not need to jump over this heart-breaking Moon.

Don’t Be Nice

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A documentary that reveals the power of poetry to speak truth to power.

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: This is Shakespeare on steroids, a poetic banquet of color, action, rhythm and sound that transcends expectations.

Don’t Let Go

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Don’t Let Go offers simple thrills with an enticing premise, but it’s the performances that ultimately make it resonate.

Dora and the Lost City of Gold

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Raiders of the Lost Ark lite for kids, but juvenile humor and a derivative plot limit its appeal for adults. Teen Dora is really cool, though, and a great role model for girls and boys alike.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: There is no keeping up with the original TV audience, 16 year-olds are not going to see Dora on a Friday night, but for the young ones, Dora is packed with fart jokes, unrelenting pep, a song about pooping, and dire warnings of how awful high school will be. Six year-olds are going to love it.

Oktay Kozak @ Paste Magazine
Amir Siregar @ Amir at the Movies [Indonesian]

  • Excerpt: ‘Dora and the Lost City of Gold’ is quite an enjoyable family adventure fare with enough action and humor for kids and adults. Isabela Moner is perfect as Dora!

Down

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Beyond scary, DOWN should have been titled “How Not To Spend Valentine’s Day.”

Dragged Across Concrete

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Zahler’s idiosyncracies as a filmmaker is fascinating to watch, and despite some sloppiness, the film has a menacing style that is wholly its own.

Dragon Ball Super: Broly

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Designed specifically for those who have a long-term investment in the characters and story.

DreadOut

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: When are teens going to learn not to go into haunted abandoned buildings where cult murders took place?

Dream Girl

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

Driven

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Drone

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Earth

ron wilkinson @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Through the camera lens, man as force of nature gets a look at human impact, and at things to come.

Echo In the Canyon

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: It’s a roller coaster of emotion that ultimately proves how incomparable those originals are. So while today’s artists honoring them reinforces this truth, it’s perhaps not in the way they intended.

Edie

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Inspiring story about an adventuresome elder who discovers the fire inside herself.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This is no twee old-lady adventure. The magnificent Sheila Hancock crafts a portrait of elder womanhood as a tangy triumph of risk-taking over regret, and resolution over resignation.

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: There are two stunningly beautiful sights in “Edie,” about an 83-year-old woman who wants to climb a mountain. The first is the breathtaking scenery of the Scottish countryside. The second is the lovely face of actress Sheila Hancock.

Ek Ladki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: Both Paul and Gilligan do justice to the character and to Breaking Bad with El Camino. It looks – and mostly plays – like an extended episode of Breaking Bad, but when you’re talking about one of the best shows ever created, that’s hardly a complaint.

The Emperor of Paris

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

Enormous: The Gorge Story

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Entangled

Ron Wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: Entangled in its mixed messages, writer/director Milena Lurie’s film struggles to find a voice as its protagonist finds hers.

Escape Plan: The Extractors

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

  • Excerpt: Avoid It!

The Eulogy

Glenn Dunks @ glenn-dunks.com

  • Excerpt: We see it time and time again when filmmakers visions can no longer be supported by a local film industry desperately craving financial success often to the detriment of quality. Where filmmakers like Jennifer Kent can remain niche because her films are violent and confronting and yet are acclaimed around the world (her next project is, somewhat predictably, American-financed). Where talent is not incubated, yet expected to succeed or else. Where they cannot afford to support its artists in any real meaningful way yet expect them to carry the industry on their backs.

Ever After

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This German zombie flick offers horror with a spin of feminine steel, not soft but brutally maternal, as necessary as natural selection and as nurturing as civilizational, even planetary tough love.

Extra Ordinary

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Overall it’s a bit slight, too light and fluffy to have much lasting impact, but it’s also a hoot.

Extreme Job

Bavner Donaldo @ Cinejour [Indonesian]
Amir Siregar @ Amir at the Movies [Indonesian]

  • Excerpt: Director Lee Byeong-heon establishes a breezy balance between complex action scenes and goofy workplace comedy, seeding quirks, relationships and rivalries into the squad that pay off throughout the film.

The Eyes of Orson Welles

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Just seeing Welles’s artwork is of interest in itself, the man’s hand drawn Christmas cards alone an intriguing study (which, yes, Cousins is able to link back to his films).

A Faithful Man

Laura Cifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Garrel’s film is both funny and wise, upending our expectations from beginning to end.

The Fall of the American Empire

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]
Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: Flopping about on the screen, this good natured snarky look at the state of the world has its highs and lows.

Fast Color

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [The metaphor] doesn’t have to be [hidden] when it’s so smartly interwoven with the fabric of such a personal narrative concerning a single family under duress.

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: There is a lot of clever subversion at play by presenting these characters in a toned-down superhero film.

Feedback

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

Un Film Dramatique

Jordan Smith @ Nonfics.com

The Final Wish

Frank Ochieng @ SF Crowsnest

  • Excerpt: ‘The Final Wish’ is strangely contemplative in its attempt to shine an eerie light on the mysteries of death and estrangement. Woodward’s gory gem is more of the psychological horror variety as it adequately taps into the realm of a messy mindset gone haywire.

Finding Steve McQueen

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a servicable crime film with a refreshingly light touch and likable cast.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: You probably won’t love Finding Steve McQueen, but [its] unyielding wholesomeness ensures you won’t be able to hate it either.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: There was certainly a porch-rocker and beer-sipper of a story to be told with Finding Steve McQueen and we get that entertainment.

First Love

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: After a foray into period Samurai films, prolific Japanese director Takashi Miike (“Audition,” “Blade of the Immortal”) switches gears with a very violent, often funny, Yakuza noir with a blossoming romance as its through line.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: First Love feels simultaneously tight and meticulous, but also wild and free and barely clinging to sanity.

Matt Oakes @ Silver Screen Riot

  • Excerpt: Takashi Miike’s ‘FIRST LOVE’ Is a Rambunctious Yakuza Rom-Com, and That’s Awesom

First to the Moon

Glenn Dunks @ The Film Experience

  • Excerpt: It’s amazing to think that there can still be so much previously unseen footage from the biggest television event in history, and yet here we are at the 50th anniversary of the moon landing with a bus-load of new documentaries claiming new takes, new interviews and, yes, new footage.

Flesh Out

Amber Wilkinson @ Eye For Film

  • Excerpt: Ochipinti’s film benefits from a strong documentary underpinning – with the lead actress saying that 70 per cent of what occurs is based on her own story at the film’s Berlin screening – showing how strong cultural expectations like this can be.

Fly Me to the Saitama

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: Whatever one may make of Fly Me to the Saitama, it’s never visually dull.

For Sama

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A heart-wrenching and unflinching documentary filmed by a young mother and citizen journalist living through the siege of Aleppo, Syria.

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: A Syrian woman, Waad al-Kateab, now lauded as an award-winning photojournalist, filmed her experiences beginning in 2012 when the Syrian Civil War began.

A Fortunate Man

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: The visions, flaws, and setbacks of a gifted young man who wants to be a Master of the Universe.

FP2: Beats of Rage

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: It doesn’t make anywhere near the impact of the previous installment or leave as deep an imprint, and it’s entirely what one might expect, but it’s still a damn fine time if you’re so inclined.

Framing John DeLorean

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: It’s history lesson, editorial, and crime drama all rolled into one. And for the most part it works.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: The title appears designed to convey several meanings: the “framing” of DeLorean by the FBI entrapment scheme, the framing of the issue of this enigma of a man, and the framing of a portrait of an American original. Perhaps the ultimate irony of this movie about a man who defies being captured in a movie is this: His most enduring legacy may be in a movie, Back to the Future, which immortalizes his DeLorean DMC car as a time machine.

Freaks

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Nothing in Freaks is as it initially appears.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The film ultimately expands to encompass a worthwhile mythology with ample sequel potential and yet about 90% of the runtime takes place within a hundred yard radius of Chloe’s house. Largely due to budgetary constraints, Lipovsky and Stein have also worked a reason why into their script that allows the world to be brought into that home.

Free Trip to Egypt

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: An emotional roller-coaster ride as bigoted Americans find common ground with the people Fox News has told them to hate and fear. I laughed and cried, found myself full of despair and full of hope.

Fugue

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Muskala [provides] them all a second chance. Whether it’s one that finds them together or apart shouldn’t matter as long as they work towards the happiness that eluded them.

Furie

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Not that any of you reading this have such criminal inclinations, but maybe don’t abduct children. You shouldn’t do this for a variety of moral, ethical, and legal reasons, obviously. But beyond that, in a purely practical sense, movies have taught us that should you travel this path, one of the child’s parents will inevitably be some sort of secret badass who will rain down holy vengeance upon you and your associates from which you will not escape. Such is the case Vietnamese director Kiet Le-Van’s Furie.

The Furies

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: The Furies becomes a tapestry weaved together with the patriarchal images of classic sources, made into a contemporary vision of the extremes our culture has reached by perpetuating these images as reality and societal truth rather than recognise the human cost of these ideas and images.

Fyre

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog VI [Croatian]

The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Even with a few rough patches, The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil bubbles with a propulsive energy. Polished and glossy, it moves along with an easy, rapid momentum, myriad action beats, and another top-tier performance from Ma Dong-seok as a businessman brawler who provides a thoughtful sharpness to this fun, if familiar, crime thriller.

The Garden Left Behind

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: You can’t discount what having a transgender cast does to ensure the psychology behind what’s occurring isn’t exploited or warped.

The Gasoline Thieves

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: In a confident, remarkable debut, Edgar Nito attaches a human element to a timely story pulled directly from the headlines.

General Magic

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: This is a fascinating story that hooks you, whether you’re tech-obsessed or tech-illiterate.

Adam Patterson @ Film Pulse

A German Youth

Ron Wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: Can we even make a movie of this? Film maker Jean-Gabriel Périot gives it a good try.

Giant Little Ones

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: So often we throw nuance out the window for increased drama when nuance conjures the best. Let everyone pretend they know what happened and watch them feverishly stumble over themselves to embrace and/or reject it. By intentionally withholding any concrete answers, Behrman lends their adolescence an authenticity rarely seen.

Gift

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A documentary showing how art keeps moving in circles of sharing, giving, and generosity.

A Girl From Mogadishu

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Inspiring story of a true activist and exemplar of bearing witness.

The Girl in the Fog

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: Toni Servillo stars here as Vogel. Best known for his award winning performance in The Great Beauty, Servillo brings from that film the continued sense of someone world weary, who has seen and done everything, for whom nothing is new.

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Well done but predictable missing person mystery gives a new director time to get his feet on the ground.

Girl on the Third Floor

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

Girls of the Sun

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: While it’s not as stylish as Husson’s Bang Gang, Girls of the Sun is just as assured. There’s a specific political message at its back and it expresses it without compromise for better or worse.

Give Me Liberty

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: An authentic heartfelt film about real people.

Ron WIlkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: Frenetic to a fault, bordering on sensory overload, this is a van ride to be remembered.

Good Sam

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Because actress Tiya Sircar projects such an appealing personality in the lead role, and the plot offers some fascinating twists and turns, GOOD SAM delighted me.

A Good Woman is Hard to Find

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

  • Excerpt: Anchored by a fearless leading performance from Sarah Bolger, this film is a tale of female empowerment that avoids talking the talk and instead walks the walk.

The Gospel of Eureka

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

The Great Hack

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog VI [Croatian]
Ruben Peralta Rigaud @ [Spanish]

A Great Lamp

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: While the film won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, Qureshi’s debut feature expresses a desire in the director to explore human suffering and modern friendships on a small scale while treating it with grandiosity, care, and seriousness.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: In covering the rap scene in Mumbai, it not only delivers an energetic and masterfully crafted crowd pleaser, but it thoughtfully touches on the various forms of oppression that the characters face in their journey.

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood
Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: As ‘Gully Boy’ evolves with its zestful, original characters, we tend to sieve the film through elements that are common in Zoya Akhtar’s universe – passion, dysfunctionality and people finding closures that are fulfilling to self and to their surroundings. Ranveer Singh, Alia Bhatt and Siddhant Chaturvedi are extraordinary in this skillfully told underdog tale.

Gundala

Bavner Donaldo @ Cinejour [Indonesian]

Hagazussa

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Blood [chapter three] is conversely magnificent enough to render the whole worth checking out alone.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Fiegelfeld’s film looks back at a time when folklore and the supernatural held a stranglehold on people’s minds, and how such a punishing religious climate affected women.

Hagazussa: A Heathen’s Curse

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This gothic, nightmarish ode to madness, the result of Christian persecution in a 15th century Alpine village, is surreal folk horror that creeps under your skin like the mists which curl up its mountainsides.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: A relentlessly moody and meditative experience that might test the patience of some while being far more rewarding to those who are sucked into its unnerving atmosphere.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: In my notes I wrote, “lots of goat close-ups and masturbation,” so…

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: With its 15th Century rural setting, Hagazussa treads some of the some ground as November and The VVitch. Unlike those two films, there is no obvious display of magic of any kind.

Halston

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: With “Halston,” Tcheng may have chosen an inelegant framing device, but he’s done an admirable job recounting the life of an artist whose relationship with the business world was both savvy and his undoing.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: It’s a tale worthy of a classic Greek tragedy. A small-town boy makes good, acquires enormous fame, wealth, and power, and then — through a combination of hubris, miscalculation, tragic flaw, and the cruel hand of fate — crashes to Earth and is destroyed.

Happy Cleaners

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …an indelible and intimate film that captures the wavering spirit of a particular family’s nucleus. Fittingly, Happy Cleaners rinses and dries its revealing American immigrant messaging with candid absorption.

Harpoon

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Mean and nasty, gleefully gory and wickedly funny.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Watching [them] fall prey to impulse knowing they’ve all done something inexcusable they’re hoping stays under wraps is fun because there’s an authenticity beneath the gore.

Matt Oakes @ Silver Screen Riot

  • Excerpt: Scuzzy ‘HARPOON’ a Stripped-Down Malevolent Dark Comedy At Sea

The Haunting of Sharon Tate

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: Tacky and ghoulishly exploitative, “The Haunting of Sharon Tate” keeps deluding itself into thinking that it’s paying respect or offering profundity when it’s just distastefully capitalizing on the tragedy.

Head Count

Mark Harris @ BlackHorrorMovies.com

The Heiresses

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: As Chela blossoms, her look changes, the character taking more care, her clothing becoming more youthful. Martinessi’s film which began shrouded in shadows, interiors like old museums, suddenly brightens, a dining room table sold opening the room up to light.

Paulo Portugal @ Insider [Portuguese]
Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: A somber character study of two lifelong companions going separate ways. One for the better and the other, who knows?

Hellmington

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Her Smell

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Moss not only goes there, she goes beyond there, ranting, vomiting, stumbling, strumming, cinematographer Sean Price Williams and composer Keegan DeWitt supporting the assault of her amazing performance.

Chris Feil @ The Film Experience
Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: For all the fun it is to watch Moss play this loathsomely uncontrollable character, seeing her out from under that armor with the pain of everything she’s done etched upon her brow is what you’ll remember most.

Hesburgh

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Fascinating documentary about a religious leader who was a master of human relations.

The Highwaymen

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It is a quiet film, delving into the relationship of these two older men, teasing out one final detail about their relationship until a crucial moment, while also taking a hard look at the dubious American celebrity culture that thrived even back in 1934.

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Too bad THE HIGHWAYMEN plods along with so many similar scenes one after another. Amusing banter between the co-stars helps move things along — but not enough to prevent the urge to nod off a bit.

Amber Wilkinson @ Eye For Film

  • Excerpt: The title suggests derring-do, when No Country For Grumpy Old Men would better set the mood.

The Hole in the Ground

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist
Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s an economically told chiller that hits beats you might be familiar with, but it’s done with just enough panache and good performances to keep things engaging.

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: Even if the climax is a bit anticlimactic compared to the atmospheric build-up, “The Hole in the Ground” remains attentive to its characters and achieves a mood that is creepy, unsettling, if not exactly frightening, and finally open to ambiguity.

Holy Trinity

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: If, like me, you’re the kind of person who relishes the opportunity to tell casual acquaintances ‘I saw this movie about a paint-huffing dominatrix who talks to the dead the other night,’ you’ll want to prioritize this one.

ron wilkinson @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: The beds of a hundred lovers are nothing compared to the one with Baby chained to it.

Homecoming: A Film by Beyoncé

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: If you don’t get why Beyoncé is worshipped as a goddess, this glorious pop spectacle — part concert film, part myth-in-the-making — will fix that. Enormously entertaining, and absolutely landmark.

Honeyland

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A heart-stirring eco-documentary about a nurturing female beekeeper in Macedonia.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Stefanov took pictures of Hatidze on a scouting expedition and the filmmakers decided to make her their focus, leading to one of the most fortuitous if heartbreaking natural dramas of the cinematic year.

ron wilkinson @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: One of the best docs of the year, and perhaps the decade, this tale has the hallmark of a simple story that took on a life of its own.

Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror

Frank Ochieng @ SF Crowsnest

  • Excerpt: [A] revealing and refreshingly insightful documentary. This is an inviting and noteworthy commentary on a particular aspect of film-making that gets constantly overlooked. Anyone ready for an updated version of ‘Scream, Blacula, Scream’?

How Does It Start

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Artistically striking with its challenges, How Does it Start is a reminder of how the uninformed see the world and it is rightfully jarring.

Human Nature

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: This documentary watches like the prequel to a dystopian sci-fi story.

The Hummingbird Project

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Excellent depiction of the cultural clash between speed and simplicity.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: You often don’t think about why you root for a film’s protagonist. It therefore becomes very glaring when this intrinsic emotional attachment doesn’t exist.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Imagine drilling — let’s say boring — a tunnel from the Kansas Electronic Exchange to the New York Stock Exchange. Now imagine watching a movie about it — yes, it’s just about that exciting.

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: A fiber optic line from Kansas to New York is a stretch.

I Am Mother

Federico Furzan @ Cinelipsis [Spanish]

I Am Not Alone

Jordan Smith @ Nonfics.com

I Do Not Care If We Go Down In History As Barbarians

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Radu Jude’s pitch black satire is an uncompromising – if occasionally draggy – look at the necessity for a nation to interrogate its past.

ron wilkinson @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: A slippery production of the Holocaust spirals nicely out of control.

I Feel Good

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Delépine and Kervern have packed their screenplay with so many gags, the movie is enjoyable just for its surface pleasures, but by the film’s musical conclusion they have also proven the joys of a simpler way of life.

I Was Home, But

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Not for every audience, but nonetheless a beautiful German drama about depression!

I’ll Take Your Dead

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: I’ll Take Your Dead starts with a young girl’s ominous voiceover about seeing dead people and the nature of death, straight into a corpse being dismembered, dissolved in a bathtub, and disposed of. It goes from there.

Imprisoned

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: “Imprisoned,” a story of vengeance, redemption and the undying transcendence of love, is the second film to be released by socially conscious Equitas. It will earn superlative praise for writing genius, outstanding acting by the entire cast, and inspired production.

In Fabric

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Peter Strickland’s Duke of Burgundy is one of my favorite movies of the last decade, so In Fabric was always a must-see. And when the first shot has a warm, crackling giallo look, a switchblade, and ‘70s style prog rock score, you have my full attention.

In the Aisles

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A portrait of life after hours in a warehouse supermarket that illustrates the way of tenderness.

In the Shadow of the Moon

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A thriller than spans decades to explore the consequences of choices.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Solid performances and a compelling premise keeps the film engaging enough despite some missed opportunities.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Because of Boyd Holbrook’s fine performance as an obsessed police officer, I tried to stay with the complicated story. Unfortunately, this time-travel film is downright confusing.

In the Tall Grass

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: While not a total success, the film has its fair share of creepy and surreal imagery that holds your attention.

Betty Jo Tucker @ Reeltalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: The grassy field seems to come alive right before our eyes. But repetition of characters shouting to each other about where they are and too many dark scenes almost put us to sleep while watching this grassy nightmare.

The Incredible Shrinking Wknd

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Shifts happen, inch by inch, and we focus in, tighter and tighter, the weight and force building until it becomes inescapable.

Instant Dreams

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: The death of the Polaroid compares the photo to the mirage. Do we care most about the instant, or the dream?

International Falls

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: International Fall delivers a charming, biting look at emotional desolation, forgotten ambitions, and neglected dreams of two people as they quietly drown. It’s lovely and insightful, dismal and austere, and tiptoes the line between comedy and tragedy.

Into the Ashes

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Into The Ashes dives into familiar territory in the revenge genre, but the story is gripping, and it features a more moody and contemplative atmosphere that sets itself apart.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: It contains most of my favorite cinematic things—Frank Grillo, violence, a grim revenge tale—but other issues bog down the film and, it brings me no pleasure to report, it simply isn’t very good.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Like its title, Into the Ashes resides in the crackling smolder instead of the bright flames. There is plenty of heat to burn and brand from that calmer temperature of cinematic coals.

Into the Mirror

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Into the Mirror moves fluidly through memory, present self-imprisonment, and future’s promise with a majority of its information shared in the absence between cuts.

The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog VI [Croatian]

  • Excerpt: Izumiteljica je film koji se itekako pogledati i koji daje jednu zanimljiv, iako prilicno uznemirujuci pogled na današnji svijet.

The Invisibles

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Shifting readily between fiction and non-fiction gives us the best of both worlds because the proof of what we’ve seen arrives directly after seeing it.

Io

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

The Irishman

Siddhant Adlakha @ Firstpost

  • Excerpt: Martin Scorsese is king of the gangster picture, but heavy lies the crown.

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: The Irishman combines the meditative pace of Silence, the sharp humor and style of The Wolf of Wall Street, and the narrative of Martin Scorsese’s greatest gangster movies to form a self-reflective magnum opus.

It’s a Hard Truth Ain’t It

Sarah Bunting @ The Blotter Presents

J.R. “Bob” Dobbs and the Church of the SubGenius

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Whatever you make of the people involved, J.R. “Bob” Dobbs and the Church of the SubGenius is a wild-ass ride, an engrossing look at a fascinating sliver of off-the-wall Americana, a minor religious movement that just sort of happened while two friends were fucking around.

J.T. LeRoy

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: …only accomplishes its misguided mission as being a boorish misfire. The I.D. crisis in J.T. LeRoy is just not riveting enough to be unmasked at the expense of alienating feminine fragility.

Jay and Silent Bob Reboot

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Kevin Smith’s most enjoyable film in over a decade, even if its relentless self-indulgences will test the patience of anyone who isn’t already a fan of this material.

Je T’aime Moi Non Plus

Ron Wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: A 4k restoration of the original wild child movie.

Jirga

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A powerful story of a soldier seeking to make amends who turns his enemies into friends.

Joy

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A grim portrait of migrant Nigerian prostitutes exploited in Austria.

JT LeRoy

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Because of the controversy surrounding [JT LeRoy], you [must] question when one of the principle players is given creative control. [But the film works in that context.]

Juanita

Candice Frederick @ New York Times

Jusqu’ici Tout Va Bien

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

  • Excerpt: Without a clear proposal, it does not stand out from the mediocrity.

Just Mercy

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Moments of hardship and tragedy do land and [the actors are up to exposing] their characters’ pain, but too often these affecting displays arrive with paint-by-number clarity.

Just Say Goodbye

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: This melodrama lacks the necessary polish to elevate not just its important message, but also the actors’ performances.

Kabir Singh

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Director Sandeep Reddy Vanga’s ‘Kabir Singh’ is a lost cause in representing a leading man with unlikeable and abusive traits. The film’s inherent misogyny, stemming out of obvious ignorance, nullifies Shahid Kapoor and the talented crew’s earnest efforts.

Kalank

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Abhishek Varman’s dated period saga is neither explosive nor emotionally involving. The talented ensemble cast and the opulent cinematography, costumes and production design deserved a better canvas than what ‘Kalank’ offers.

Kardec

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: The subject matter lends itself to confusion and the dialogue seems a bit flat, but costumes and interesting settings help us feel a sense of place, and that’s important for a period movie like this.

Kesari

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: “Kesari” is a dishonest, stilted film that does no justice to the historic Battle of Saragarhi!

Khandaani Shafakhana

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

The Kid

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: With so many different iterations of the same exact story flooding the cinematic market every year, it’s nice to look at a common narrative through a new lens.

Killerman

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Killerman wants to be a hard-edged crime drama. Aside from some nicely gritty cinematography, it brings nothing of value to the table.

King of Thieves

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [Despite being] a pretty straightforward genre film, the sheer joy of seeing these actors comment on their careers through these characters [should provide] a good time.

Knife + Heart

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: I do like this film much more than Gonzalez’s debut, You and the Night. It’s a more fully realized dreamscape of transgression.

Knife+Heart

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Brilliantly photographed in primary colors of blue, red and yellow… Gonzalez reflects his story back upon itself via films-within-his-film, black and white photo negative nightmares, dance floors, dark rooms and sex shows.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Knife+Heart is nothing if not stunning in its 70s aesthetic with film grain, sumptuous neon glows, and synth score [even if the climax] feels more convenient than fulfilling.

Knives and Skin

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Bleak and grin, but ultimately hopeful and optimistic, Jennifer Reeder creates something unique and special. She’s a fresh new voice with much to add to the conversation.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Reeder situates this little town in an ethereal space, where magic realism is always potentially hiding, waiting to be found, and the past connects itself to the present via acapella versions of songs from the 1980s.

Knives Out

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Contemporary but old-fashioned shaped whodunit that both enlivens and refreshes the genre.

Knock Down the House

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A brisk and meaningful look at four women running to change American politics.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Knock Down the House earned the Sundance Film Festival’s Audience Award, a sure sign this documentary is both feel-good, inspirational, and at times a call to action. The glass ceiling is broken and the playbook is written – Rachel Lears and her four heroines, notably Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, will now show others how to make the politically impossible, possible.

Alan Mattli @ Maximum Cinema [German]

  • Excerpt: A hopeful film – and we can all use a bit of hope.

Koko-di Koko-da

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Twisted and terrifying, it offers a time-loop of grief, death, and adorable animated shadow puppet bunnies and birds, which he also manages to turn scary and unnerving as all hell.

Kumbalangi Nights

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Precisely put, debutante director Madhu C Narayanan’s ‘Kumbalangi Nights’ is one of the greatest Indian feature films to be made in modern times. Brave, layered and laced with fantastic performances, this one is a fine genre piece which knows how to appetize and ultimately serve a sumptuous spread to those craving a magnetic cinematic sojourn.

Label Me

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: Beauty in the beast

Ladyworld

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: “We’re not boys, we’re not brutal,” intones Dolly (Ryan Simpkins) in a broken, high-pitched cry. It’s more question than statement, and unfortunately for her, she’s about to learn precisely how savage teenage girls can be to one another.

The Last Laugh

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Chevy Chase and Richard Dreyfuss know the way to entertain us! Watching these two is lots of fun — with a tear or two when it’s done.

The Last Serb in Croatia

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog Film Reviews

The Last to See Them

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

The Lavender Scare

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Another shocking and horrific expose of American hatred and ignorance.

Leaving Neverland

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Leaving Neverland is not an easy watch, but it’s a necessary one that finally allows the victims to speak for themselves.

Glenn Dunks @ The Film Experience

  • Excerpt: Reed does something great with with this material, which could so easily have been sensationalized or turned into cheap, ghoulish true crime fodder. His approach is elegant, refined and simple and yet holds the weight that such a discussion deserves…

The Legendary Stardust Brothers

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: More unhinged nonsense than you can cram into a silver bodysuit.

Leto

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Serebrennikov is obviously having fun with his history lesson of mood above drama. And since I’ve been listening to Kino ever since, I guess I was too.

Level 16

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: the big reveal undermines Esterhazy’s carefully laid and creepy setup, a case of meticulous years long planning turning out to be utterly unnecessary to its end goal, if more dramatically interesting.

Liam Gallagher: As It Was

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: This is required viewing for any Oasis fan.

Life After Flash

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

The Lighthouse

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist
Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: You don’t watch The Lighthouse. You absorb it. Pattinson and Dafoe are like caged animals slinking around the perimeter, testing each other’s resolve before pouncing.

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: Roommates are Awful, Especially in Eggers’ Brilliant ‘THE LIGHTHOUSE’

Little Italy

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

Little Monsters

Rob Daniel @ Electric Shadows
Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: While maybe not the freshest take on the undead, the image of Lupita Nyong’o in a bright yellow dress, beheading walking corpses with a shovel is enough to fill me with glee.

Jon Partridge @ Cinapse

  • Excerpt: A gory, expletive-ridden venture, that occasionally crosses the boundaries of good taste, while still offering a surprisingly touching addition to the zombie genre. It’s the latter that sets it apart, and it owes a debt to an incredible turn from Lupita Nyong’o who captivates as well as decapitates.

Little Woods

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Little Woods is a solid directorial debut for Nia DaCosta with yet another stellar performance by Tessa Thompson.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: An astonishing directorial debut from Nia DaCosta, featuring career best performances from Tessa Thompson and Lily James.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The result is a contemporary western where morality trumps legality every step of the way in a world where luck plays a larger role than anyone cares to desire.

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

The Lodge

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Long Day’s Journey Into Night

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: You may have trouble navigating its plot, but if ever there was a movie to get lost in, this is it.

Roderick Heath @ Film Freedonia

  • Excerpt: We are of course watching Bi’s movie and he knows it, using the privilege to rewrite his own reality.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Bi Gan is brave to attempt a feat like this and I wonder how much of it was to satisfy a creative need and how much it was for purposeful notoriety. Like much arthouse cinema, the film defies easy categorization and will truly appeal to only a thin slice of the movie-going public, but for those few, Long Day’s Journey Into Night is pure catnip.

Long Gone By

Brad Gibson @ Film Threat

Long Lost

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: A story about two brothers who’ve never met— the younger, scrappier Seth (Adam Weppler) and the older, wealthy, and weird Richard (Nicholas Tucci)— and the disparate lifestyles they lead transforms from what initially appears as an elaborate psychosexual mind-game into a metaphor about the ever widening gap between the working class and the bourgeois.

Lords of Chaos

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: That it succeeds as well as it does is largely due to Culkin, director of photography Pär M. Ekberg’s striking visuals and its truth-is-stranger-than-fiction story about artists who prize image over all.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Lords of Chaos has everything you want from a fact-ish based dramatization of the darkest, most infamous chapter in extreme metal history. But while it’s high on spectacle and lurid, sensational details, it skimps on depth and motivation.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [It] could ultimately care less about the music when the psychology of this scene’s progenitors is what intrigues. This is about aesthetic, notoriety, and paranoia.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Lords of Chaos is, at times deeply, darkly funny, taking nothing away from its very true to life horror. Neither does it detract from Åkerlund and co-writer Dennis Magnusson’s focus on how the gruesome history of Mayhem is a hard lesson about authenticity, exploitation, fame, and the often self-fulfilling prophesy of those who step too close to the edges of true darkness.

Lost Holiday

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Love Child

Jordan Smith @ Nonfics.com

Love, Antosha

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Never has the phrase ‘labor of love’ been more appropriate as it is for this incisive, engrossing and often surprising documentary on the beloved young actor.

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

Low Low

Frank Ochieng @ Film Feast

  • Excerpt: …[a] vastly affecting and perceptive coming-of-age youthful feminine fable. One will sure catch a natural high when screening the understated grittiness of the triumphant yet telling Low Low.

Low Tide

Roxana Hadadi @ Pajiba

  • Excerpt: A24’s ‘Low Tide’ assembles pieces of ’80s cult classics to build an enjoyably tense slow burner about class and crime.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Low Tide isn’t groundbreaking or unique, but it knows its setting and characters enough to make the journey authentic despite its lack of surprises.

Lucy in the Sky

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Anyone who’s been exposed to director Noah Hawley’s work on television (‘Fargo,’ ‘Legion’) would have high expectations for his theatrical feature debut, but while there is a lot of craft on display here, Hawley’s artistic choices are often questionable…

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: For all the aspect ratio changes, ruminations concerning what going to space can do to a person, and solid performances from a strong cast, the film is still plagued by problems regarding the story.

Luka Chuppi

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Lynch: A History

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Lynch: A History offers an engaging portrait of the man, the athlete, his life, and his time, as well as a fascinating experiment in narrative craft, form, and construction.

Made in Abyss: Journey’s Dawn

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: Despite its flaws and foibles, when this uneven first half comes to its inevitable cliffhanger close, we’re still curious to see what creative craziness awaits us in part two.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Combining these old tapes with news footage from the time, animated route maps and present day interviews, Holmes and his editor Katie Bryer have fashioned one of this year’s most rousing and emotionally satisfying documentaries. This one had me busting with pride for my gender.

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: The riveting tale of misogyny-busting sailor Tracy Edwards is as beautifully modulated as fiction, full of twists and turns and delicious ironies, and even sports a perfect ending. Yet it’s all true.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Beyond the social & political ramifications of what their vessel setting off at the cannon blast meant, however, is also a riveting adventure pitting humanity against nature.

The Man Who Feels No Pain

Darren Mooney @ the m0vie blog

  • Excerpt: He probably couldn’t even feel his sides splitting if he watched this film. (It’s great.)

The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: I was deeply impressed by its tonal gymnastics, and the way it squeezes out genuine emotional resonance from campy and delightfully goofy ideas. Sam Elliott carries the film with a sense of gravitas that keeps you glued to the screen.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: There’s a throw-down beat-it-up with Bigfoot at the end, but action is otherwise limited. This is instead about the man behind the legend and the heartache that defines him.

Maria

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Watches like an especially brutal ‘90s era throwback. Complete with techno-heavy nu-metal-scored fight scenes and clubs full of decade-appropriate dance-floor lighting.

Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Documentary about the magical and toxic moments in the lifelong relationship between the poet/songwriter and his muse.

Marighella

Amber Wilkinson @ Eye For Film

  • Excerpt: Credit to the actor-turned-director for thinking big with his first directorial project but in pursuit of the bigger picture, quite a lot of the smaller intricacies are lost.

Marilyn

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: … reflective and probing…the film’s gripping essence in conveying the pressures of a gay teen tormented by directional signs of angst-ridden burden does have its affecting, dramatic impact.

Marriage Story

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Shoots for laughs despite its serious nature.

Mary

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The pieces are in place for a solid horror film, but the flashback structure robs the film of most of its tension.

Mary Magdalene

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A creative, relevant, and reverent film about Mary Magdalene, a deeply spiritual woman for all ages.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A fiercely feminist and proudly revisionist historical drama that offers a powerful and much-needed rebuke to modern Christianity. Enrapturingly beautiful and intensely emotional.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: By placing this epic journey through Mary’s eyes we can understand the sacrifice as being more than just time and energy. Where Peter sought answers, her choice to follow Jesus was a betrayal to her name.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: As the first witness of Easter, Mary Magdalene is a person of special testimony who always had more to her significance. This film honors that magnitude with virtue of its own.

Master Z: Ip Man Legacy

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: You wouldn’t think a martial arts movie featuring Tony Jaa, Michelle Yeoh, and Dave Bautista would be dull. Here’s Master Z: Ip Man Legacy to prove you wrong.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: This will surprise absolutely no one, but Yuen Woo-ping can stage the hell out of a fight. The guy is a legend for good reason.

Meeting Gorbachev

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It is a bittersweet experience to hear Werner Herzog recount Gorbachev’s history.

Mega Time Squad

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The concept has been done before, and better, most notably by “Colossal’s” Nacho Vigalondo in “Time Crimes,” but Dammen’s gang that literally can’t shoot straight is so clueless, rooting for his bumbling protagonist proves an entertaining, if trifling, amusement.

Memory: Origins of Alien

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: … with that subtitle it is no surprise that a lot of the inspiration for “Alien” came from author Dan O’Bannon’s childhood.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Does precisely what any good cinematic documentary should: it helps us see a classic motion picture from new perspectives.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Think of Philippe’s journey into O’Bannon’s imagination as a syllabus presenting an overview on a wide range of captivating topics for which Alien becomes a palatable gateway.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Memphis ’69

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen

Glenn Dunks @ ScreenHub

  • Excerpt: Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen is more than just a standard bio-doc of Wikipedia dot points; it couldn’t be even if that’s what director Heperi Mita had wanted. After all, Merata Mita’s Wikipedia page is fairly barren. A tell-tale sign that to this day, nearly a decade following her death, her legacy remains clouded in prejudice and a lack of historic understanding.

Mia and the White Lion

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: Despite a heartfelt sentiment, and the filmmakers’ desire to raise awareness about an abhorrent practice, packaging it in a family-friendly narrative proves to be problematic.

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Midnight Traveler

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This intimate documentary works on many levels… First and foremost, it illustrates the plight of the refugee during a global nationalism movement when even legal shelter can prove unsafe.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Meet the Fazili family. They’re on the run from the Taliban, no country will take them in, yet there are two little girls who just want to dance to Michael Jackson and settle down some place where the locals don’t throw rocks at them.

Mike Wallace Is here

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Avi Belkin’s probing documentary, Mike Wallace is Here, searches for answers. Did Wallace transform investigative journalism and loft it to new heights? Or did this pitchman/low-grade actor peddle an early form of “gotcha” journalism – more show business than pure reporting?

Mine 9

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: While “Mine 9” reveals how coal miner teams become a community and support each other through family birthdays and tragedies, the takeaway for me was the crucial importance of advocacy and pay stability.

Mission Mangal

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood
Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

Mister America

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

Modest Heroes

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a short and sweet anthology that offers three distinct shorts that not only show off brilliant animation, but further promise for Studio Ponoc’s future as a major force in Japanese animation.

Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: The humanity and beauty of this documentary absolutely overwhelmed me. Bravo to director Irene Taylor Brodsky for bringing this inspiring true story to life on screen.

Ms. Purple

Allyson Johnson @ CambridgeDay.com

Murder Mystery

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: Even as a diverting romp, “Murder Mystery” is neither as involving as an everyone’s-a-suspect whodunit should be, nor is it ever as funny as one would like it to be, but it’s an amicable time-killer.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Jennifer Aniston and Adam Sandler are no strangers to comedy, so they do their best in MURDER MYSTERY. But most of their comic banter falls flat.

Music Teacher

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

The Mustang

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Uplifting story about how a wild mustang becomes a spiritual teacher to an emotionally shut-down man.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The eventual breakthrough between man and beast is incredibly moving, the mustang comforting Roman just when he thinks the horse has beaten him.

Dan Lybarger @ Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

  • Excerpt: Basing her story on a real-life program that takes place in Nevada and other states, freshman feature director Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre and a horde of co-screenwriters craft a story about bonding with horses that’s uplifting and refreshingly candid. Clermont-Tonnerre depicts that equine therapy in a way that demonstrates the good horses can do for people without making the process look easy or pat.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

My Days of Mercy

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Beautifully incisive performances by Ellen Page and Kate Mara create a prism through which to examine how the death penalty impacts those far beyond death row. Hardly subtle, and yet still delicate.

My Son

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A throttling study of the toxic dynamics of anger.

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

The Name of the Rose

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A medieval whodunit with moral firepower that reflects a reverence for books.

Native Son

Vince Mancini @ Uproxx

Neither Wolf Nor Dog

Bradley Gibson @ Film Threat

  • Excerpt: A Native American Lakota elder, known only as Dan, asks a white write from Minnesota to visit and help him write a book about his people.

New Money

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: We find we can enjoy the performances more than the characters. We believe their emotional investment in isolation, but not in regards to the bigger picture.

No Mercy

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: At best, the film plays like Taken with a mean streak, or a South Korean version of Faster; but even with a fantastic central performance, it mires down in grimy exploitation.

Noblemen

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Tackling the sensitive theme of teenage bullying, debutante filmmaker Vandana Kataria’s ‘Noblemen’ is an empathetic take on a victim’s perplexing mindscape. Featuring Ali Haji, Kunal Kapoor and Muskkaan Jaferi, the film also offers a tasteful Shakespearean allegory.

Notebook

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Nothing Stays the Same: The Story of the Saxon Pub

Don Lewis @ Hammer to Nail
Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A comedy that encourages viewers to reflect on what makes them happy.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Ode to Joy is about a man with a disease that causes him to pass out whenever he experiences pleasure. He’d be safe seeing this movie.

One Child Nation

Chris Barsanti @ PopMatters

  • Excerpt: Starting as a personal look at the damages wrought by decades of China’s one-child policy, One Child Nation exposes a deeper, baser level of national corruption.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a horrifying look at state sanctioned kidnapping and murder and human rights violations against women whose effects are still being felt by families today even as they defend the practice.

One Cut of the Dead

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Take one hypochondriac, an alcoholic, the overly committed wife of the director and his daughter, an aspiring director… combined with routine on set mishaps, and witness how mistakes and imagination aid the filmmaking process.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Clever, hilarious, and deeply, deeply satisfying.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: With good performances and clever additions to Shakespeare’s play, there’s enough here to provide real entertainment.

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: There are parallels, and mirrored dualities throughout, and it is not only Ophelia whose character is made more vivid and complex.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [It plays] with the idea of storytelling itself and the degradation, absence, or addition of information depending on an author’s identity.

The Other Story

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: Nesher skillfully balances a lot of characters and storylines, each illustrating a different kind of Israeli and a different connection to Jewish life, culture, and practice, but he never lets any of them become symbolic rather than real.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: When parenting is paired with religion, logic is in pell-mell retreat and remains so throughout Israeli director Avi Nesher’s entertaining but scattershot story of strained relationships and cultural divides in contemporary Jerusalem.

Otherhood

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Three lovely stars try acting their best. Yet humor fails the comedy test.

Our Time Machine

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Our Time Machine is a funny and moving documentary about an artist’s attempt to cope with his father’s illness by literally and metaphorically creating a time machine.

Outlaws

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A24’s Greek tragedy by way of violent biker saga is fine, but you’ve seen it before.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Without that nuance to rip their wounds open, though, it’s tough thinking anyone but hard-drinking criminals already in an MC to crack skulls will find much appeal.

Pain and Glory

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This isn’t the first time writer/director Pedro Almodóvar has gone the autobiographical route in his filmmaking, but this may be the most moving, his 22nd full length theatrical feature carefully considered, deeply felt and vulnerably revealing.

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Pain and Glory is a colorful, funny and profound film where Pedro Almodóvar reckons with his past and career — featuring a career-best performance by Antonio Banderas.

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: Even as he’s gotten older, Almodóvar puts in enough here to suggest he has a ways to go before stopping.

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

Painkillers

Frank Ochieng @ SF Crowsnest

  • Excerpt: ‘Painkillers’ certainly does not reinvent the wheel when it comes to the physicality or emotional presence of pain and suffering. [It] definitely works on the nerves and reinforces a certain kind of fixation that is more than imagined or hallucinatory.

The Painted Bird

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Without compromise in its bleakness.

Papi Chulo

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A sensitive portrait of urban loneliness.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: An uncomfortably clueless portrait of societal privilege taking advantage of financial desperation. Matt Bomer is very effective as a man truly heartbroken, though.

Paris Is Us

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: This ultra-serious French drama ranks as the most intense movie about grief I’ve ever seen.

The Parts You Lose

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: You won’t see a better example of pure cinematic storytelling this year than “The Parts You Lose,” an engrossing thriller about a young boy named Wesley (Danny Murphy) who befriends an injured criminal in hiding. Most of the movie is conveyed through his point of view, which is especially fitting because the central character is hearing-impaired.

Paul Sanchez Is Back

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: Meet you at poolside and never mind the cement mixer.

The Perfect Date

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: The cute push-pull chemistry between Noah Centineo and Laura Marano sealed the deal for me. Full disclosure: I’m an incurable romantic.

Perfect Strangers

Courtney Howard @ FreshFiction.tv

  • Excerpt: This deliciously wildly provocative chamber piece is not only universal in its audience appeal, it has clever twists that make for thoroughly engaging entertainment.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: The tingles that come from the mounting uncertainty of the characters project very well to the viewer. The very same can be said for the demand of answers.

The Perfection

Blake Crane @ Film Pulse

  • Excerpt: The Perfection is always intriguing and consistently shocking, the drama and sleaze anchored by fantastic performances that sell every demented twist and turn.

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: The Perfection‘s first half portends a sharp and tense psychological thriller with two committed performances by Allison Williams and Logan Browning as the former and current star students of a prestigious music academy respectively. But one poorly executed twist followed by another takes away any goodwill the movie builds in its genuinely well-constructed setup.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Delightfully bonkers and wildly unpredictable, but once it reaches the third act, it loses itself with heavy issues that the filmmakers simply aren’t prepared to tackle.

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: The Perfection is a lurid, brazen, steadily insane ride that catches one off-guard as it keeps changing and shuffling through so many different thriller subgenres—an erotic thriller, revenge horror thriller, contagion body-horror and psychological thriller, and not necessarily always in that order—with nearly as much flair and tension as the best of Brian De Palma and Park Chan-wook.

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A mesmerizing historical drama about democratic fervor met with ruthless brutality.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Peterloo is therefore less historical document than anthropological study and ultimately might say more about our present than its own.

Photograph

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: There is a sadness to these two characters that permeates the film and its gentle romance.

Pigeon Kings

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Did you know there’s a specific breed of pigeons that summersault mid-air? Did you know groups of people around the world who raise birds to do just that and have turned it into a competitive sport?

The Pilgrim’s Progress

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: This animated adaptation of John Bunyan’s timeless allegory doesn’t so much surprise as it does reaffirm faith during gloomy times.

Pledge

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: “Pledge” is confidently shot and has a nasty, buzzy thrill about itself, but would it have killed the filmmakers to at least provide a more likable or just sympathetic character who didn’t feel like composite leftovers from a “Porky’s” sequel?

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Pledge offers a hyperrealistic vision of the frat world that’s simultaneously outrageously exaggerated and also true to the nature of these violent, male-dominated institutions.

Plus One

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The appealingly down-to-earth Jack Quaid as Ben and the raunchier and offbeat Erskine as Alice share a rare type of best friend shorthand that makes them fun to be around.

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Plus One is a hilarious and, dare I say, relatable take on the classic rom-com formula with enough sharp one-liners — particularly by Maya Erskine — to keep you hooked.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: The smoothness behind the alcohol-tinged bite of Plus One is to watch the two operate through softening each of their prickly characters against each other.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: With its fine cast members and clever plot, this rom-com made me laugh a lot.

Point Blank

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s hardly groundbreaking, but as a throwback to 80s buddy action movies, the leads are solid, the action beats are fun, and it doesn’t overstay its welcome.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Who cares if the ending of this fast-paced action thriller seems a bit cheesy? It’s the exciting journey that counts.

Polar

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: This abhorrent actioner is vulgar auteurism at its most depraved.

Polaroid

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Some clichés, but a cool end result

Poms

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: The blueprint for a genuinely inspired, warm-hearted dramedy is indeed there, it’s just that the filmmakers can’t figure out how to properly utilize what they have.

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: a delivery system for some vague message about empowerment and sisterhood, as resilient as its cute golden agers, despite some unsettling “jokes” about blackmail, rape, elder abuse, and, kind of, murder.

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: [A] silly-minded chuckler that needs to be rejected from the try-out squad. Of all the cheerleading routines that Keaton and her calisthenics cougars could have done in Poms is the split…as in splitting from this fruitless, rheumatoid romp.

Porno

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: If you lament the lack of graphic genital torture or exploded testicles in modern horror cinema, you’re in luck. First time director Keola Racela’s Porno has the cure for what ails you.

Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

The Prey

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: But even with the problems, The Prey is watchable and should satisfy action fans for a time as they wait for the next movie from the likes of Gareth Evans and Timo Tjahjanto.

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

The Prince and the Dybbuk

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [It’s] a fascinating forensic case into an enigmatic man who seemingly transitioned between four or five vastly different lives within his sixty years on Earth.

The Professional: A Stevie Blatz Story

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

The Professor

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: An off-season ditty for Johnny Depp, this short story of a short life gives Depp the time to do a short performance.

The Proposal

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A sophisticated documentary about architecture, power and control, and exquisite beauty.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The documentary Magid’s most reminded me of was the ground-breaking “Capturing the Friedmans,” another work assembled like a piece of mystery theater, its purpose not just to relay information in the most artistic manner possible but to astonish us by just what it has withheld.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Jill Magid’s extraordinary art project, the genesis and execution of which unfold in this strange, almost dreamlike documentary, is like a story devised by Edgar Allen Poe, or perhaps Edward Gorey.

Prospect

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

The Quiet One

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Though “The Quiet One” begins with the story of Wyman’s distant parents and loving grandmother, it is not a deeply introspective or insightful film on what makes Wyman tick. There are no revelations about his bandmates and no thoughtful reflections on what he finds meaningful in life.

Rafiki

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: What makes Kahiu’s film essential beyond that moral and artistic victory [against Kenyan legal prejudice] is its ability to instill hope within a hopeless situation.

Rainy in Glenageary

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: unless you are a hardcore Republican, or maybe even if you are, her words will have you rolling in the aisles.

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: An acerbic political Texan who served up the stark naked truth with cutting, irreverent humor, the Ivins doc gets you laughing at the truth because, in all honesty, it is so crazy.

Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Thought-provoking documentary on the journalist whose humor challenged government incompetence and social injustices.

Rambo: Last Blood

Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com [French]

  • Excerpt: Stallone, when not attempting to scale rarified thespian heights with neither metaphorical crampons nor oxygen tank to assist in the ascent, maintains his lopsided grimace and trademark grunt as he stalks along with cold dead eyes and a generally distracted air.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: One great action set piece is not enough to make up for a troubling and simplistic story that fails to evoke all the elements that made the central character so striking.

Ramen Shop

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It’s too bad the title of Singaporean director Eric Khoo’s has been homogenized for English language audiences as the original title, “Ramen Teh,” refers to the melding of two cultures’ famous dishes, Singapore’s Bak Kut Teh and Japan’s Ramen, into one, just like its protagonist.

Jared Mobarak @ BuffaloVibe

  • Excerpt: Ramen Shop ends up simultaneously being a pilgrimage and exorcism [whose] heartwarming tale of love overcoming prejudice [becomes] a visual smorgasbord of food porn.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: It’s a sentimental journey, but the cast plays it beautifully, and the many cooking scenes create a delicious highlight reel along the way.

Ray & Liz

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The overall effect of “Ray & Liz” is something like early Terence Davies Gothic, the nostalgia of his post-war reminisces of working class Liverpool replaced with the cold harshness of Thatcher’s England, yet just as eerily beautiful.

Kent Turner @ Film-Forward.com

Red Joan

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: True story of an English woman who questions the way governments go about national security.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: There’s a lot of hot-button stuff going on in this A-bomb spy drama — politics, sexism, scientific ethics — but it’s all surprisingly inert, given the literal fate-of-the-world stakes.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: This isn’t about trading secrets as much as accountability and how we’re so willing to punish the symptom rather than the disease itself.

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: It is not about spy craft; it is about saving mankind from itself.

The Red Sea Diving Resort

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: As popcorn-ready as this true story may be, its marginalization of the real people and their plight is more than a little inexcusable.

Relaxer

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: We get eighty-minutes of empty promises before ten-minutes of off-the-wall live wire insanity fulfill what we were conditioned to accept wouldn’t come. Too little, too late.

Replicas

Steve Biodrowski @ Hollywood Gothique

  • Excerpt: Never fully answers the questions it raises, but that almost seems to be the point.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The film has enough compelling ideas and entertaining moments to not be a complete waste, but it still doesn’t do enough to elevate the material above anything other than an amusing distraction.

Vadim Grigoriev @ kinoblog.com [Ukrainian]

The Report

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: The information itself is dramatic and tense regardless of whether the lead has the capacity to add more to it than an incredulous face.

The Reports on Sarah and Saleem

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: charts how a misguided affair becomes a matter of national security while also exploring privilege, power and gender and cultural disparity.


Ron WIlkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: Melding the hurtful and selfish extramarital affair with the explosive politics of the occupied West Bank makes this a great thriller for our time.

Reverso

Paulo Peralta @ CinEuphoria [Portuguese]

Riot Girls

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Ambitious and cool, but also a bit lacking in one key area.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Think the cinematic equivalent of a 90-second punk song; it gets in, goes fast, and whips up the crowd. Sure, there’s not much space for thematic nuance, intricate embellishments, and elaborate technical showiness, but that’s not the point.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Riot Girls proves just as much about a new generation taking the reins as it does empowered women expunging toxic male entitlement.

The River and the Wall

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A remarkable documentary that gives us hope that young people documenting the consequences of a border wall will make a difference.

Rojo

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Naishtat [gives] his audience the credit to read into things with their own historical and political interpretations. Not being that audience means I can admit the film didn’t work for me personally while also lauding its craft.

Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Rosie

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Moving drama about a suddenly homeless family dealing with the challenges of this increasingly common situation.

Rottentail

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: I can look past subpar acting and shoddy effects if the script is sounder than a sexist, man’s man pissing contest. Rottentail is not.

Round of Your Life

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Despite having reservations with the type of film and the inherent issues generated, I can’t say I hated the journey. There’s an authentically bittersweet nature present that just overcomes its limitations. – Despite having reservations with the type of film [it is], I can’t say I hated the journey. There’s an authentically bittersweet nature present [to] overcome its limitations.

Ruben Brandt, Collector

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Film critics, myself included, missed the boat on building buzz for this, submitted for consideration for the 2019 Animation Oscar. I sentence myself to forty lashes. “Ruben Brandt, Collector” is an explosion of deftly curated imagination, a dazzling and hugely entertaining film.

Jared Mobarak @ BuffaloVibe

  • Excerpt: Writer/director Milorad Krstic has combined his love for painting and film into an action thriller as surreal as it is familiar.

The Russian Five

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: I’ll never stop hating the Red Wings, [but I can now] appreciate and respect what the organization did to change the league’s entire landscape through its astronomical rise.

The Ruthless

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog VI [Croatian]

Sadako

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Sadako, maintains the standard creepy, atmospheric vibe at the same time it updates the franchise mythology for a YouTube, anything-for-clicks generation. I mean, it’s hard to make a killer VHS tape scary in a day and age when no one even has a VCR, right?

Saint Bernard

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Originally completed in 2013 and only now finally being distributed by Severin Films, Saint Bernard is a culmination of what FX master and director Gabe Bartalos has done over the years.

Saint Judy

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An ethically rich drama about asylum law and the uplifting emotion of elevation.

San Andreas Mega Quake

Paulo Peralta @ CinEuphoria [Portuguese]

Santiago, Itália

Paulo Portugal @ Insider [Portuguese]

Satanic Panic

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Class war, gooey horror style.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Stardust and Hendrix use socioeconomic language to present a satire of capitalism, using the cult as a way to confront the disingenuous, dangerous realities of neoliberal thought.

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Sator

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Although you can follow the story as an entirely supernatural horror tale, Graham makes the film readable as a view on the destructive legacy of hereditary psychological collapse across generations of a single family.

School’s Out

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: School’s out for a very special band of hyperkids and the graduation party features all-you-can-eat destruction.

A Score To Settle

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: How Frank’s redemption and revenge are intertwined is well thought out enough to support the narrative choice to flip some things on their head, but the execution falls short.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
Betty Jo Tucker @ Reeltalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Nicolas Cage chose the right amount of restraint in his portrayal of the unhappy, obsessed lead character in this dark thriller. But he has one almost over-the-top scene that will stay with you after the credits roll.

Sea of Shadows

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A documentary that unreels like an action thriller to tell the story of attempts to save the vaquita porpoise from extinction.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: The powerful subject matter is enough to carry this movie, although the telling is sometimes weakened by its too-broad approach.

Secret Obsession

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Too bad some scenes appear a bit repetitive and hard to believe. Still, I never lost interest in brave Jennifer’s plight.

See You Yesterday

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Not perfect, but it has heart and a firey passion for exploring truths about society through a clever idea, and it sets up Stefon Bristol as a filmmaker to keep an eye on.

Candice Frederick @ New York Times
Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Serial (Bad) Weddings 2

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

  • Excerpt: This does not seem so inventive in the jokes of his script, as it describes a simply vivid picture of modern French reality, that does not correspond to the truth.

Shadow

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: It brings me no joy to report Zhang Yimou’s ‘Shadow’ does absolutely nothing for me.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Share

Andrew Wyatt @ Cinema St. Louis

She’s Just a Shadow

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Director Adam Sherman has clearly absorbed a Sion Sono and Takashi Miike flick or two, and while the acting is bland and the dialogue may elicit some chuckles, the wild and colorful visuals are up to his influences, and he goes all out to give the audience what they crave, with little filter on the stylish sleaze and depravity.

Shooting the Mafia

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: About bravery, self-determination, and standing up in the face of great, crushing adversity, Shooting the Mafia paints a picture of a bold figure, but is also about something so much larger than a single person or story.

Sibyl

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

  • Excerpt: A Volcano Wakes Up.

Sides of a Horn

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A powerful short film that explains the conflict between poachers and rangers over rhinos in Africa.

The Silence

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Not a knockoff of that other quiet horror flick, though this familiar monster movie works hard to convince otherwise. But the terrific cast makes it worth a look, at least for Netflix subscribers.

The Silence of Others

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: But now a growing number of citizens, friends, family and sympathizers to the resistors of the Franco regime is asking for restorative justice.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: The revelations of Franco-era horrors, including some chilling footage of actual mass executions, are stunning.

Silent Panic

Frank Ochieng @ Flickfeast

Silhouette

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

Sister Aimee

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

Ski Bum: The Warren Miller Story

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

Skin

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: They need Bell to give the tour de force performance he does in order to allow them the ability to go into the darkness with him. A just world would place him in the awards conversation, but ours will probably not give Skin the platform necessary for that to happen.

Skin in the Game

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A sobering portrait of human trafficking for sex in suburban United States.

The Society

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A top-notch drama about youth facing the challenges of citizenship, community, and freedom.

Someone Great

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: Someone Great services the head and heart in equal measure, hitting home the poignant profundity of Robinson’s portrait of female friendship and fortitude.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Much of the dialogue in this rom-com seems sketchy and peppered with too many crude comments, but I admire the film’s emphasis on diversity and friendship.

Sonchiriya

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Director Abhishek Chaubey’s ‘Sonchiriya’ is a superlative ode to lives in Central Indian ravines. Actors Manoj Bajpayee, Ashutosh Rana, Sushant Singh Rajput, Bhumi Pednekar and Ranvir Shorey are matchless throughout with each of them acing the Bundelkhandi dialect to perfection.

Sophia Antipolis

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: A technology center rotting from within by a slow burn neutron bomb of the soul.

The Sound of Silence

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A creative exploration of the interactions between humans and the sounds of the things around them.

South Mountain

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: A powerful female-centered drama that is a meditation on loss and healing.

The Souvenir

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: In her first leading role, Swinton Byrne, her only prior experience playing her mother’s daughter in “I Am Love,” is a revelation, her passion outweighing any lack of confidence, her naïveté endearing, her need to believe in her lover heartbreakingly relatable.

Courtney Howard @ AwardsCircuit.com

  • Excerpt: Hogg’s slow-burning, coming-of-age drama feels like a lived-in experience – one that’s simultaneously heartbreaking and heartening.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: I wasn’t dazzled as much as disappointed that it told us so little about Hogg’s inner feelings in a film that was so personal.

Sprinter

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: This jogs along a predictable path, but makes a mad dash straight for the audience’s gut right before the finish line.

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Executive produced by Will and Jada Pinkett Smith, “Sprinter” is an exhilarating inspirational story of immigration conflicts, family, perseverance and love.

The Spy Behind Home Plate

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: The story of Moe Berg is a great one. First generation son of Jewish immigrants, Princeton man, professional athlete, linguist, world traveler, radio quiz champ, playboy, an intellectual who got his law degree from Columbia University while playing major league baseball. And a spy.

Ron Wilkinson @ its just movies

  • Excerpt: James Bond before there was a James Bond, pro baseballer Moe Berg hit a few homers and made a few errors.

The Standoff at Sparrow Creek

Ken Bakely @ Film Pulse

  • Excerpt: The Standoff at Sparrow Creek is formally and aesthetically fascinating, even when its script feels a little incomplete.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Henry Dunham’s twisty, dialogue heavy chamber play is a taut psychological thriller that upends our expectations, pulling the rug out from under us in its final moments.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a taut and precisely constructed thriller that shines the spotlight on a group of terrific character actors.

Stare

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Stare doesn’t necessarily give J-horror fans anything new. Still, Adachi’s film is incredibly creepy, touching on themes about how and why folk tales affect us, and how the past connects with modernity through urban legends.

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

State of the Union

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Ten ten-minute films in which a couple grapples with the difficulties of maintaining an intimate relationship in our hurried times.

Stockholm

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: While [the comedic] direction appears to do a gross disservice to these characters’ real life counterparts, it does make for a pretty fun movie.

Storm Boy

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Storm Boy is as much about its people and settings as it is about its a boy and the bird that never leaves his side.

Stuck

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A parabolic musical about what needs to happen to achieve the ancient dream of unity and respect for all people.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Pure gritty urban joy, all marvelous, touching songs about grief, sacrifice, mistrust, misunderstanding, and other intimate perils. An exuberant marvel.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: The spoken and sung revelations of each character’s plight create a clashing cross-sectional dip into America’s Melting Pot. These poignant emotions fuel biting social commentary in a way few films, big or small budget and musical or otherwise, have ever succeeded.

Student of the Year 2

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood
Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

Styx

Jonathan Richards @ Pasatiempo

  • Excerpt: Writer-director Wolfgang Fischer fashions a surprisingly involving tale out of a movie that, for much of its 94-minute running time, has one character and practically no spoken words.

Sunset

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …the filmmaker has captured the uncertainty of radical history with compelling artistic control.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: If you were to tell me Sunset was set in a “Westworld” type amusement park, I wouldn’t have batted an eye. Írisz becomes innocence itself trapped in a world at war.

Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: While it lacks the revelatory impact of its predecessor, this follow-up is still informative, entertaining, and slightly disturbing.

Superpower Dogs

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: Not all heroes wear capes – some of them wear collars.

Jana Monji @ Age of the Geek

  • Excerpt: Superpower Dogs should give your dog-crazy kid ideas of careers to explore outside of the veterinarian route. For dog lovers everywhere, movie is just fun and full of sloppy, exciting reasons to love dogs even more.

Surviving Confession

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Breaking the fourth wall and spilling waterfalls of internal monologue, Surviving Confession pokes and prods the person who is supposed to be the pillar of strength.

The Sweet Requiem

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: This is a deeply moving story, inspired by a true account, shot alternately in the desolate high Ladakh region of the Himalayan Mountains and in the Tibetan exile warren of Delhi.

The Swerve

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Sword of Trust

Derek Deskins @ Edge Media Network

  • Excerpt: aron’s performance as Mel is wonderful, delicate and dirty, and it elevates the film in every way, feeling like something only Maron could deliver. In its ridiculous premise, “Sword of Trust” draws you in and then floors you with its surprising depth and subtle witty humor.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: An absurd situation growing more surreal as the minutes tick away because their level of intrigue can’t help outweigh their trepidation in dealing with racist monsters.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …a spry, absurdist tease below the Mason-Dixon Line that fabulously registers its outlandish lampooning of southern pride and promise in a deadpan ditty that stings with sharpened wit.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Shelton (Humpday, Your Sister’s Sister) lays on plenty of laughs, but there’s a layer of serious ideas lurking beneath the fun. You don’t need a certificate of authenticity to see how the craziness that Shelton slyly delivers here reflects the condition of the world we live in.

Tel Aviv on Fire

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Nashif and Biton work wonderfully together, one cracking scene showing them writing jointly in unison, only to pivot and end up at odds.

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: Tel Aviv On Fire works quite well in presenting a unique situation for an area that could use more lighthearted stories targeting a mainstream audience.

That Part Feeling

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Music is the language in which Pärt is comfortable explaining himself. And as far as this film is concerned, if you want to know about the world’s most-performed living composer, that is where you’ll find it.

Them That Follow

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Then Came You

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: Though it has many of the qualities that made teen terminal-illness weepies work, Hutchings’ dramedy eschews much of those films’ sincerity and intimacy in favor of sap.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The final result isn’t without flaws, but it’s so much more than appearances presume.

Frank Ochieng @ Screen Anarchy

  • Excerpt: [A] quirky-minded yet solidly conceived dramedy. A cheeky story that resonates soundly in its sprinkled charm and contemplation. Indeed, Then Came You is thoroughly affecting…the first official Valentine of 2019 and it throbs convincingly.

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Then Came You doesn’t have to be a message-thumping torchbearer for anything. Instead, it is squarely comfortable with its pile of pluck and parade of quirks.

The Third Wife

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Vietnamese writer/director Ash Mayfair makes her feature debut inspired by the life of her own great-grandmother, its visuals (by “Pop Aye” cinematographer Chananun Chotrungroj) informed by the beauty of the natural world.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: A society where men are worth more than women suffers the consequences of that injustice. Mayfair reveals this truth in its tense brutality despite never relinquishing her handle on the aesthetic beauty housing those horrors.

This Changes Everything

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

This One’s for the Ladies

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

Thriller

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: There haven’t been many slasher films with an entire cast comprised with people of color that it’s a shame the South Central-set “Thriller” is just not a very good one.

Thunder Road

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: Everybody grieves in their own way. Only a few do it with jazz hands.

Tigerland

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A documentary about a century of conservation efforts to save tigers in India and Russia.

To Dust

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Shawn Snyder explores death and grief in a morbidly funny, yet surprisingly resonant way.

Tokyo Drifter

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: The banality of dialogue and incomprehensibility of plot can wear a little thin, but Suzuki keeps things so visually lively that it’s hard to hold the movie’s deficiencies against it.

The Tomorrow Man

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: works best as a showcase for its senior love story, Danner in particular concocting an adorably odd character

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

Tone-Deaf

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: While [Tone-Deaf can be a rollicking good time] when stripped of the excess a peripheral cast ruled by convenience provides, those moments are few and far between.

Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Frank Ochieng @ Flickfeast
Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Directed by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, a friend of Toni Morrison’s for over 35 years, the film is itself a moving, loving collage of colleagues, proteges, archival footage, family photos, paintings, nature scenes, and historical documents.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: The appeal of this stirring documentary is the pleasure it affords in spending of a couple of hours in the world of the great Toni Morrison, her friends, and her literary legacy.

Top End Wedding

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: The Sapphires’ director reteams with Miranda Tapsell for Top End Wedding. Do they still shine?

Total Dhamaal

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Trained

Don Shanahan @ Every Movie Has a Lesson

  • Excerpt: Unbridled passion releases as the public display of affection in the Chicago chill shifts to warmer private interiors. This opening scene of filmmaker Yuri Rutman’s spare yet sizzling short film tantalizingly begs many questions.

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: While “Trespassers” gives its characters plenty of interpersonal drama to work with before their life-or-death struggle, there is precious little to care about.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Some script and originality issues aside, ‘Trespassers’ is a solid, if familiar, home invasion horror.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Because [the main quartet] have no real relationship to the [object of their pursuers’ desire], this encounter’s sheer randomness is proven anticlimactic from the start.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …is competent enough to embrace its thrill-seeking mediocrity to the point of stimulating, corrosive curiosity. Trespassers is inspired by its high-wire handy-work of invasion horror

Triple Threat

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: There’s a scene in Triple Threat where Tony Jaa fights Scott Adkins, then Tony Jaa and Iko Uwais fight Scott Adkins, then Tony Jaa fights Scott Adkins solo again. A scene. Actually, not even a scene, it’s a sequence within a scene.

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: …synthetic showdown of low-rent lacerations and belabored beatings. Triple Threat is more of a single slingshot of cut-and-paste frivolity that seems more makeshift than raucously inspired

The Trouble With You

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …the type of commercial French filmmaking which rarely gets released in the U.S., a silly lark which is enjoyable while you’re watching it but is immediately forgettable.

Ron Wilkinson @ Its Just Movies.com

  • Excerpt: French humor that does the impossible, transcends the Atlantic humor barrier.

True Fiction

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Logic has no place here.

The Truth

Paulo Portugal @ insider [Portuguese]

Tscharniblues II

Alan Mattli @ Maximum Cinema [German]

  • Excerpt: A multi-layered film about an experience all too often ignored in Swiss documentary cinema – urban life.

Tu me manques

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: A singular achievement

Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Funeral

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews

  • Excerpt: As we potentially close out the Madea Cinematic Universe, A Madea Family Funeral offers typical Madea material: an odd mix of soap opera melodrama and raunchy humor with a hint of morality thrown in.

frank ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: …casket-filled clownery. Predictably contrived…Perry…we beg you–stop the inane gimmick and allow Madea to retire in her flowery bloomers in peace.

UglyDolls

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: UglyDolls is less a movie than an infomercial for the plush Hasbro toys designed to be “ugly” in a commercially cute, lovable way.

Unplanned

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A reasonably engaging (if likely controversial) story about a woman who has a crisis of conscience at her job, anchored by a strong leading performance.

Untogether

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: A solid dramedy elevated by a stellar cast that signifies greater things to come for its writer/director, Emma Forrest.

Uyare

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

The Vanishing

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The Vanishing is a haunting and riveting thriller with a great Gerard Butler performance.

Varda By Agnes

Amber Wilkinson @ Eye For Film

  • Excerpt: A charming and playful consideration of her career.

Varda by Agnès

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Varda por Agnès

Paulo Portugal @ Insider [Portuguese]

The Vast of Night

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Vault

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

  • Excerpt: The final conclusion is certainly positive. Surprise!

VFW

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Villains

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: amusing little black horror comedy gets most of its laughs from Skarsgård’s inspired performance, his porn-stached Mickey a good-natured if cowardly doofus with surprising flashes of inspiration triggered by his girlfriend’s devoted belief.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: With a likable and charming cast, Villains offers some solid genre thrills with a twisted sense of humor.

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Full of sneaky twists, it’s not what it initially appears; while it feels light and bubbly at times, it also gets dark and bleak and sweet.

Virus

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Executed to near-perfection by Aashiq Abu, Indian film ‘Virus’ is the closest that a contemporary feature can get to documenting a deadly medical adversity with honesty and empathy.

Vita & Virginia

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: The legendary literary lesbian romance, starring the incendiary duo of Gemma Arterton and Elizabeth Debicki, is criminally blah, lacking all sexual and intellectual passion. How does this happen?

Volition

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Vox Lux

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: In Vox Lux, Natalie Portman plays a pop star (singing original songs by Sia!) reckoning with the decades of trauma she not only suffered—beginning with a school shooting—but also wrought, as a producer of disposable music, as an addled absent mother, and as an influencer of terrorist violence.

Waiting for the Barbarians

Rob Daniel @ Electric Shadows

Wake

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …[an] inventively off-kilter dramedy. Ambitiously witty and oddly poetic, Mirakhor’s offbeat “traumedy” exhibits a display of unusual warmth and wackiness

Walking on Water

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: fascinating and often funny

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: The fate of the lost child and the crisis of crowds on the walkway enhance an already must-see film on perhaps the greatest artist of our time.

The Wandering Earth

Emmanuel Báez @ Cinéfiloz [Spanish]

  • Excerpt: China’s most expensive sci-fi film is just decent.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The Wandering Earth is an immensley satisfying experience even at its most silliest. It’s the kind of simple, yet bold and unabashedly populist blockbuster that Hollywood hasn’t made in a while.

Roderick Heath @ This Island Rod

  • Excerpt: It might be a bit too easy to say The Wandering Earth proves China can make blockbusters just as dumb and broad as Hollywood, but it’s certainly tempting.

João Pinto @ Portal CInema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Watch out Hollywood, China is coming!

War

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: You don’t have to be well versed in Bollywood to find things to enjoy in its enthralling action sequences and bonkers plotting.

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: While Hrithik Roshan and Benjamin Jasper’s zany cinematography contribute the most in making ‘War’ worth a watch, director Siddharth Anand somehow ensures that he delivers better thrills than he did in the half-baked ‘Bang Bang’!

We Believe in Dinosaurs

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: But the issue this documentary exposes is the use of tax dollars for a religious exposition. The company behind The Ark Encounter exclusively hires people of a specific Christian creationist belief system who sign a statement specifically denouncing homosexuality as a sin.

We Have Always Lived in the Castle

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: A Gothic treat about women seeking to escape the brutality of men, as well as how rural America casts anybody misunderstood in the light of Otherness.

The Wedding Guest

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Winterbottom is experimenting with genre conventions, but how he meshes them together strips each of the intrigue they might have brought to the table alone.

Jana Monji @ Age of the Geek

  • Excerpt: Turn down this invite.

What Is Democracy?

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A thought-provoking documentary presenting the challenges and flaws of democracy from ancient Greece to modern times.

What We Left Behind: Looking Back at Deep Space Nine

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Despite blatantly targeting the fans that helped crowdsource it, the much loftier goal of contextualizing DS9 within the annals of sci-fi and television history is also met.

What You Gonna Do When the World’s on Fire?

Candice Frederick @

When Margaux Meets Margaux

Ron Wilkinson @ Its Just Movies.com

  • Excerpt: Doppelgangers a generation apart learn equally from each other’s victories and mistakes.

When Mom Is Away

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

  • Excerpt: All the jokes are cold and frozen…

Where’s Daddy?

Frank Ochieng @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: [A] highly reflective and absorbingly insightful documentary. Where’s Daddy? is gripping and thought-provoking in its serious look at deprived families paying an ultimate price

Where’s My Roy Cohn?

Chris Barsanti @ Slant

  • Excerpt: This sharp, to-the-point portrait of the crook, fixer, and right-wing pitbull resists the urge to darkly glamorize him.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Even though Cohn died more than 30 years ago, his stain on American culture remains and was revived with Trump’s election; therefore, here is a new documentary to remind us who he was, the crimes he committed, and to piss everyone off all over again.

The White Crow

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: There are brief snippets showcasing ballet but little in the way of performances. I wanted to see more of that talent and less brooding.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Elegant but dull, and so subtle it’s downright diffuse. If you don’t know much about Rudolf Nureyev going in, you won’t know much coming out, either. Weirdly, it doesn’t even feature much dancing.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: You don’t need to know [Nureyev] or care about his art. This story is about [his defection]. [This is] a good thing since Rudi is a very difficult character to like.

Who Killed Cock Robin?

Ron Wilkinson @ Its Just Movies

  • Excerpt: At times overly complicated and frustratingly murky, this noir has all the twists and turns right up to a strong and unique ending.

Who Let the Dogs Out

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: It’s a question that has plagued humanity since the dawn of time, or at least, you know, since the dawn of the summer of 2000. And as demonstrated by the new documentary from Brent Hodge answering that question isn’t quite as easy as one might initially expect.

Who Will Write Our History

Jonathan Richards @ Pasatiempo

  • Excerpt: Our appetite for documentaries about the Holocaust has been amply fed over the years, and a new film on the subject may not be as eagerly anticipated now as it once was. But every now and then, something like Who Will Write Our History comes along and demands our attention, reminding us that the unthinkable happened, that it was committed in a civilized society by human beings upon other human beings, and that it took place within still-living memory.

Who You Think I Am

George Zervopoulos @ Movies Ltd [Greek]

Why Don’t You Just Die

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Why Don’t You Just Die!

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: It plays like a Looney Tunes cartoon gone bloody and psycho.

The Wild

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: How Titus presents the mining argument from Pebble Mine’s own executives, how he slowly but gravely makes his case with a depth of respect for Alaska and its people, and how he humanizes the Bristol Bay predicament with his own journey in life reveals true genius in filmmaking.

The Wild Pear Tree

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: while much of “The Wild Pear Tree” revolves around the written word and oral debate, Ceylan’s masterful eye, especially for landscapes, ensures his latest is yet another luxuriating, cinematic soak.

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

The Wild Top End

Glenn Dunks @ ArtsHub

  • Excerpt: The Wild Top End hopes to play large-format theatres around the world as well as return engagements in Australia’s scant IMAX venues. A distant path to profitability, but who can complain in this market? The first such film for Wild Pacific Media, I hope The Wild Top End 3D finds an appreciative global audience and not just a local one.

William

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Plays with its let’s-clone-a-Neanderthal plot like it has no idea of the horrors involved and no appreciation of the ethical questions it raises. (Paging Ian Malcolm!) A tremendous missed opportunity.

The Wind

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …screenwriter Teresa Sutherland explores the [frontier madness] concept with demonic trappings, director Emma Tammi smartly using time shifts to distract from the tale’s final revelation while masterfully creating a tone of oppressive dread.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: A thoughtful and creepy psychological horror film that tackles the loneliness of the old west. Caitlin Gerard carries the film effortlessly.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Sutherland’s script is working on multiple levels while Tammi’s formal aesthetics reveal an artist in complete control of her vision.

Wine Country

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]
Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: If you think watching a group of middle-aged women rolling down a hill is funny, WINE COUNTRY is for you.

Woman at War

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A watershed Icelandic film which will speak to the hearts and minds of all committed women who are working toward the creation of an ecological world.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: While the blend could be adjusted to taste, its funnier moments on the gentle scale of humor, “Woman at War” continually reinvents itself, Geirhasdóttir’s vibrant performance its compeling constant.

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Majestic and sometimes inexplicable, “Woman at War” is a fabulously thought-provoking film that inspires and entertains.

Woodstock: Three Days that Defined a Generation

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Filmmakers Barak Goodman and Jamila Ephron have done a heroic job of marshaling archival footage from that extraordinary weekend 50 years ago and of documenting the recollections of festivalgoers, voices cracked with age, as they remember the days that shaped their lives and their generation.

Working Woman

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A drama showcasing ways to respond to sexual harassment on the job in the age of #MeToo.

The Wretched

Scott Phillips @ The Movie Isle

Wrinkles the Clown

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Wrinkles the Clown takes you completely by surprise, saying something worthwhile about how people generate and respond to fear.

X – The eXploited

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Director Karoly Ujj-Meszaros crafts a taut, chilly, noir-inspired thriller. The film touches on the twin tides of political upheaval and creeping fascism, delves into dark corners of Hungary’s Communist past, and presents a protagonist coping with trauma that may be more connected to the surrounding events than she realizes.

XY Chelsea

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Pensively melancholy, this jagged, humane portrait of US Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning is a massive challenge to the notion of soldiering as a good way for a lost young person to find oneself.

Yardie

Ken Bakely @ Film Pulse

  • Excerpt: Inspired direction can’t save Yardie from a formulaic script.

Zeroville

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Zeroville tries to be Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, but it can’t when everything happens in earnest. Purpose is lost beneath its clashing tones and hollow aesthetic.

The Zoya Factor

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

ZZ Top: That Little Ol’ Band from Texas

Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Story of the blues-inspired rock band who describe themselves as an oddball group.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: That Little Ol’ Band is a fun, enlightening look at one of the most unique and talented acts in the history of popular music.

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